Leigh Witchel

Walter Gore

30 posts in this topic

I am lucky enough to have seen Winter's Night, Victim, Eaters of Darkness and two other of Walter Gore's works on films held by Batsheva Rothschild. There was a friend of Batsheva's visiting that evening some 35-40 years past, and she revealed that two of Gore's works that the Bat company was to stage would be staged by someone other than Walter Gore or Paua Hinton; a Sven Norrlander who was coming from Hong Kong at the Cmtesse de Hoechst's. Now that I am trying to assemble a writing on Walter Gore I run again and again into the Sven N name. I find he had worked all over the planet and staged any number of different choreographer's works for them in ballet and modern form. Now I want to find out about this type of person who is trusted to stage others works. Is Norlander out there and willing to talk or has anyone else have anything to share about Norrlander or other artists who have enjoyed this kind of meritous trust?

Thanks in advance of hearing from you.

I also have never heard of Sven Norriander but that doesn't mean he doesn't exist or is not legit.. He no doubt is a re-constructor of other choreographer's works, either those living or dead. As a rule, the re-constructor is a notator or has a close relationship with the choreographer in question and is familiar with the work and is named in the choreographer's will or trust as inheritor of his works.. Dance notators, or "Choreologists" go all over the world staging from the written scores that they have done or those notated by another choreologist. They have the rights to do this and the rights come along with the notation of the score. This has been proven the most accurate and reliable way rather than relying on memory.becasue every detail is documented in the score. Staging from a video is a tremendous help but not as accurate as a written score; the same way you wouldn't want to stage an opera from just listening to a recording of a particular performance.

My guess is that Mr. Norriander performed in these works or assisted in their re-staging as a ballet master, etc. and so the choreographer gave him the rights to re-construct the work. Or perhaps he is a qualified notator and has notated the works. You could check with the Institute of Choreology in London or the Dance Notation Bureau in NY and find out if they are registered there. Just going around and staging another's works, unless you have this kind of permission or legal rights would be an infringement of copyright and is illegal. It is basically theft. Agnes de Mille always had quite a time dealing with that.

.

Share this post


Link to post

Thank You, Richka

I will now try these leads that you have shared. The charge that Norrlander was a master criminal secret ballet-stager is a major hoot, and worth writing up on its own. These charges should cause him to stand up from wherever he is now hiding to respond, and then i will interview him. Another responder has shared that Sven Norlander appears exceptionally in at least three dance films, one of which is Danses Concertantes, suggest another lead, rather more difficult to search out.

That you have and share so willingly such deep love for and understanding of dance and dancers is deeply heartening and a treasure.

Share this post


Link to post

Thank You, Richka

I will now try these leads that you have shared. The charge that Norrlander was a master criminal secret ballet-stager is a major hoot, and worth writing up on its own. These charges should cause him to stand up from wherever he is now hiding to respond, and then i will interview him. Another responder has shared that Sven Norlander appears exceptionally in at least three dance films, one of which is Danses Concertantes, suggest another lead, rather more difficult to search out.

That you have and share so willingly such deep love for and understanding of dance and dancers is deeply heartening and a treasure.

Welcome to Ballet Alert and thanx for the compliment. I see you reside in Santa Barbara, CA. Are you familiar with State Street Ballet and its Director, Rodney Gustavson?

Share this post


Link to post

Thank you for the welcome greeting.

While Santa B is the county, my home is up in tiny Montecito's hill country. I rarely go to Santa Barbara or see ballet anymore, and the last I remember of Ballet in Santa Barbara was one of those please donate thingy's where I was introduced to someone named Tamara, the family name escapes me now, who was directing something and a fellow who was introduced as her then visiting choreographer but who intimated oddly that he was committed to making sandwiches commercially. I remain hopeful this was an in-joke that still escapes me but is remembered. His name was, I seem to believe, a Mark Wild. This was a bit ago.

Share this post


Link to post

"....who intimated oddly that he was committed to making sandwiches commercially. I remain hopeful this was an in-joke that still escapes me but is remembered. His name was, I seem to believe, a Mark Wild. This was a bit ago."

Bay Area balletomanes will be familiar with the work of Mark Wilde, who was associated with the Pacific Ballet of San Francisco and with Oakland Ballet. He choreographed a sensationally successful version of Ravel's "Bolero" which Oakland Ballet danced frequently as the finale to an evening's dances.

Bolero (1974)is kind of post-mod Etudes/Grand Pas Classique designed to display the classical technique of the whole company. It's set on a bare stage with barres in place, with the back walls showing, a step-ladder that reaches into the flies, and trees of lights in plain view. The ballet proceeds like Etudes from academic exercises to moves of increasing complexity and difficulty, with the rising excitement of Ravel's music to rachet-up the levels of challenge to the truly formidable. Beautifully constructed, clear, honest, wonderful ballet. The dancers used to perform it in practice clothes, which let the accuracy of their placement, their finesse in transitions, and the musicality of their dancing create the transformation of them from Oaklanders (black, white, Asian, and of all body-types) into noble, god-like ballet-stars. It was a sensationally effective piece for the company -- it made the whole city proud of them, and it was easy to tour in both senses, since audiences everywhere loved it and them, and all the costumes could go into a suitcase or two. It was re-costumed later in bright-colored unitards, which also worked.

WIlliam Huck's "Oakland Ballet: the first 25 years" lists 8 ballets in Oakland's rep, ranging from Concerto Grosso #1 in G to Brahms Intermezzi, La Valse, Afternoon of a Faun, Jazziana, The Sirens, and Concert Waltzes (with Raoul Pause).

Share this post


Link to post