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Trying to reread books you loved when you were younger

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Most of my re-reading has been in the role of parent. Starting at the very beginning, with "Winnie the Pooh", which I remember of course from very young, but really appreciate the humor much more now. ;-) (it was one of the childrens' books which I could read aloud to my kids and I enjoyed it at least as much as they did!)

My girls loooved the rhymes and poems, so we got really into those, too; they became favorite "songs" when getting dressed, walking to school, etc.

Tolkien's books were a huuuuge favorite with my kids from when they were about six and four. I started with the "Hobbit" and then soon they wanted the "Lord of the Rings", too, which we read three times (all of them) throughout the next years, finishing with the "Silmarilion".... I enjoyed them again, but for different reasons, mostly to do with language. (:-))

(as an aside, I found those books to be the best for my daughters' English skills, as they only hear it from me)

Books which I loved as a teen and now cannot seem to get into are the Hesse favorites: Steppenwolf and co. I suppose I could now try to read them in German, as I am pretty fluent in that by now, but something about those kilometer-long sentences scares me. :-O

-d-

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It never occurred to me before that re-reading is part of a parent's job description, in a sense. :angel_not:

I haven't read Steinbeck since I was in high school and it would be interesting to go back and take another look; I've been thinking about it ever since visiting the Steinbeck museum in Salinas last year.

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It never occurred to me before that re-reading is part of a parent's job description, in a sense.

It's one of the perks, actually. I'm currently re-reading/reading aloud to my son D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths. :angel_not:

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It never occurred to me before that re-reading is part of a parent's job description, in a sense.

It's one of the perks, actually. I'm currently re-reading/reading aloud to my son D'Aulaire's Book of Greek Myths. :icon8:

Oh, I love that one! There's a companion book on Norse mythology as well, if you're interested.

And I totally agree about reading as a perk!

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I just loved Jane Eyre when I was younger. I first read it at about 10, and about once a year after that for years. Then I reread it many years later, and don't think it holds up too well, as a grown up book. I didn't mind the comment about the French (!), but the self pity got to me. I think it is the ultimate teen-age book, right up there with Catcher in the Rye. Wuthering Heights on the other hand is just staggering.

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When I was about 14 years old I got hooked on the PBS series All Creatures Great And Small. This prompted me to read the book by James Herriot, followed by the other three books in the series. I adored these books. The humor, compassion and emotion really hit a nerve with the awkward, nerdy and socially inept girl that I was. When I was on complete bed rest with my unborn daughter 7 years ago I re-read all them (after all what else was there to do?) Re-reading them again brought back all the warm, happy feelings I got when I first read them.

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When I was about 14 years old I got hooked on the PBS series All Creatures Great And Small. This prompted me to read the book by James Herriot, followed by the other three books in the series. I adored these books. The humor, compassion and emotion really hit a nerve with the awkward, nerdy and socially inept girl that I was. When I was on complete bed rest with my unborn daughter 7 years ago I re-read all them (after all what else was there to do?) Re-reading them again brought back all the warm, happy feelings I got when I first read them.

I loved those books, too, and it wouldn't surprise me that they hold up well.

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