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Peasant Pas choreographyJules Perrot, Petipa?


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#1 hermes

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 09:05 AM

I understand the music for Peasant Pas was added to Adam's score by Frédéric Bergmüller. Because this came later, I'm wondering if Jules Perrot is the choreographer of this pas. I read somewhere that the leaps in peasant pas are at least in the manner of a Perrot ballet.
The reason I'm asking is that I recently prepared a playbill for a performance by my kids at the Governor's Honors Program of Georgia and got it wrong; I originally listed Petipa as the choreographer (terrible scholarship on my part! Yikes, how embarrassing!) I understand that Petipa did assist with a restaging for the Kirov and introduced some solos; but that it was Perrot that is responsible for the bulk of the work. Any information is greatly appreciated.
B

Edited to try to correctly display acute accents and umlaut. Apparently BBCode doesn't like character entities; though they are displaying fine on my, ahem, Mac.


#2 Pamela Moberg

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 03:14 PM

The Peasant pdd with music by Burgmuller - imagine two dots over the second "u". was first choreographed by Coralli. Then I suppose we can say that Petipa tampered with it, and I suspect so did some other choreographers. Coralli's version was first seen in 1841, so it is a bit hard today to imagine what it looked like then. :angel_not:

#3 Mel Johnson

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 06:22 PM

It's in the ballet because the original ballerina in the woman's part, Nathalie Fitzjames, had a sweetheart contract with the Paris Opera to dance in the opening of every major new production. When it got to Russia, I imagine Petipa did fiddle with it, but it's one of the most pristine examples of the structure of the pre-1870s pas de deux that exists today.

#4 hermes

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 07:01 AM

Thank you for the responses. I wish I had taken the time to post here before I printed my program! Poor scholarship on my part! I'm fairly mortified. I did set it well, though; as we say down here: it ain't braggin' if it's true! :clapping:
Giselle has such a rich history it seems that there's enough backstory there for a movie...Wait a minute! This doesn't tell the story of the ballet's creation, of course. Seems like there's plenty there, though.
I appreciate the quick replies and the next time I leave my cheat sheet at home; I'll remember to check here before I embarrass myself!
Thank you!
B.

#5 Helene

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Posted 29 July 2006 - 08:27 AM

I'm able to insert śpéčïàł çħåřãċțëřŝ using the Character Palate on my Mac (and the Windows thingy -- that's a technical term -- as well as alt+combinations on my PC) and they show up fine here.

Perhaps your browser code page is incompatible? My browser (Firefox) is set to use Western: ISO-8859-1. On Firefox, the setting is under View/Character Encoding. On Safari, it's under View/Text Encoding and the options either of the Western options. Also "Default" works the same as the two Western options for me in Safari, but I would think that's dependent on geography. Safari works for extended ASCII characters only and will replace Eastern European and Turkish characters, for example, with ????'s.


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