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Tcherepnin's "Le Pavillon D'armide"beautiful!


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#16 phenby

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Posted 10 April 2006 - 09:18 PM

I will split the ballets into two separate replies.
Following the close of the 1909 Paris season Diaghilev decided on a new commission for the 1910. The story of how he first requested a score based on the Firebird legend from Liadov, only to pass it on to an unknown newcomer, Igor Stravinsky, is well-known. What history has missed is the existence of a third commission. Nikolai Tcherepnin was also approached to compose a Firebird ballet. Apparently the result did not meet with Diaghilev's approval. Tcherepnin salvaged the beginning of his Firebird (the only part composed ?) as a tone poem entitled Le Royaume enchante. The published score carries a scenario that largely copies the libretto of Stravinsky's version. There was never a stage production of this score.
One recording (excellent) came out some years back:

album title: The Enchanted Kingdom
Mikhail Pletnev & Russian National Orchestra
Deutsche Grammophone DG 447 084-2

contents
Tcherepnin: Prelude pour La Princesse lointaine, Op. 4 symphonic poem
Tcherepnin: Le Royaume enchante, Op. 39
Rimsky-Korsakov: Le Coq d'or: suite
Liadov: Baba-Yaga, Op. 56
Liadov: Le lac enchante, Op. 62
Liadov: Kikimora, Op. 63

By the way, the three pieces by Liadov were used in Massine's Contes Russes produced by the Ballets Russes around 1916. Diaghilev was determined to have his Liadov ballet.

Phenby

#17 Solor

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 02:20 AM

Thank you for this very valueable info.....is that recording only excerts? I know Ill shock the living you know what out of my fellow ballet talkers, but I have never liked Stravinsky. But of course I LOVE "Sacre du Pritemps".

Liadov worked for the Imperial Ballet - He orchestrated the Deldevez score for "Paquita" for the original Russian staging, as the manuscript was delayed from Paris, and all that was available was a piano reduction. I think he was also a rehearsal violinist?

#18 phenby

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 10:44 AM

In his twenty years of ballet and opera productions Diaghilev only rejected a commissioned score a handful of times. Tcherepnin heads the list as having produced two such scores.

In the early seasons Diaghilev had a secretary/advisor by the name of M. D. Calvocoressi, a young French music critic. Calvocoressi met a young, unknown composer (I forget the name) who had written a ballet score on his own entitled La masque de la mort rouge (The Mask of Red Death after Edgar Allen Poe). Calvocoressi passed the score along to Diaghilev who wasn't interested in the music but found the story an interesting idea for a ballet. Diaghilev approached Stravinsky on the subject but was rejected. So he turned to ... Nikolai Tcherepnin.

In 1913, when Tcherepnin composed his ballet, Fokine had been dismissed and Nijinsky was now choreographer of the Ballets Russes. But Nijinsky was very slow and couldn't be counted upon to produce four new ballets every season. So for the 1913 season Adolph Bolm and Boris Romanov, two dancers in the company, were given their first opportunities to choreograph (both went on to long careers as choreographers). Tcherepnin's La masque de la mort rouge was schedualed for the 1914 season, but since Nijinsky was already overextended with preparations for two other ballets, Diaghilev assigned Tcherepnin's ballet to a guest choreographer: Alexander Gorsky. Then the rupture between Nijinsky and Diaghilev occured. As a result, Fokine came back to the Ballets Russes for the 1914 season and took charge of all new choreography. La masque de la mort rouge and Gorsky were scrapped. Tcherepnin's ballet was produced by another company in St Petersburg in 1916 (I don't know the details).

After the Russian Revolution the orchestral score of Tcherepnin's ballet could not be located. So Tcherepnin reorchestrated parts of his work in the form of a suite. This work was titled: Le Destin, trois fragments symphoniques sur une nouvelle d'Edgar Poe, Op. 59.

A recording was issued on CD a few years back
OLYMPIA OCD 640
Alexander Rudin & Musical Viva Orchestra

Nikolai Tcherepnin: Le Destin, Three Symphonic Fragments on a Ballad by Poe, Op. 59
Alexander Tcherepnin: Divertimento, Op. 90
Ivan Tcherepnin: Double Concerto

The suite covers about one-third the orignal ballet score. Diffuse music but VERY atmospheric!
Phenby

#19 dkeary

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 08:56 AM

I worked with Madame Danilova while a student at SAB, and I was part of the cast for the Workshop performance in 1979. I am also part of Anne Belle's film and featured in it during rehearsals. The ballet Le Pavillon d'Armide is rich in its history and the score is beautiful. During the Ballet Russe reunion in New Orleans a few years back, two dancers performed the variations. The ballerina's variation was quite similar to what Danilova taught, almost identical. The male variation was not the same. However, Madame Doubrovska was at many of the rehearsals and she helped Danilova since she was in the original production in Paris. I asked Doubrovska about that and here is what she said, almost perfect quote as I remember it: "Well, I was very young and my part was that of a page. I was responsible for holding the big plume over the royality as they watched Karsavina and Nijinsky. When Nijinsky came on for his variation, he was standing upstage left, he went plie, and he flew across the stage. It was so magnificient that I dropped the plume on top of the royal ensemble." And then she smiled as she told the story.

David Keary

#20 dkeary

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Posted 05 May 2006 - 09:01 AM

i know for a nijinsky fest. in hamburg? during baryshnikov's early years in the west an effort was made to restage some part of this ballet.


It was in fact the pas de trois, (which Danilova came to Hamburg to stage), and I remember that Baryshnikov's variation began with a huge, sideways jump. Additionally, many years ago I saw the Kirov in what was described as a pas de deux from Coppelia. Neither music not choreography resembled anything I'd ever heard or seen in Coppelia, and I was later told that it came from Le Pavillion d'Armide.


This is correct, the jump was to the side, it actually could have been on the diaganol from what Doubrovska told me. There are a couple of books on Nijinsky that discusses the variation, I'll have to look for them in my library, but it describes the choreography.

#21 leonid

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 04:27 PM

As a very young man I became the friend of the composer Alexandre Tcherepnin in the late 1970's. He was the son of Nicolai Tcherepnin and himself the composer of several ballet scores. We had several discussions about his father's career and I was permitted to peruse the family archives. In addition to his work for Diaghilev Nikolai Tcherepnin wrote several other ballets, including three resounding failures for Pavlova: Dionysus (1921), Ajanta's Frescoes (1923), and Old Russian Folk Lore (1923). Besides Pavillon d'Armide and Narcisse there have been two other ballet scores of Tcherepnin recorded in the not too distant past. I'll pass on details if there's interest. Regarding the former, only the Maryinsky and Diaghilev companies had productions (there were some differences). The production of Narcisse by Diaghilev was quite a story. I don't believe it was ever produced by another company.
PHENBY


Narcisse was staged on the 28th May 1918 at the Aquarium Theatre Moscow by Laurent Novikov
designed by I.S. Fedotov with Novikov as Narcisse and Yelena Mikhailovna Adamovich as Echo.
Kasyan Goleizovksky Choregraphed a solo to music from this ballet which has been danced by Vasiliev, Malakhov, Tsiskaridze and Gennadi Yanin among others.

#22 leonid

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 04:49 PM

As I understand it, the Maryinsky keeps a version of the ballet as a student showpiece, but I don't know how long it's been since the main company has done it.


The version you refer to, originates from the revival of Fokine's ballet staged by Lopukhov and Chekryiugin on the 6th May 1923 at the Petrograd Theatre of Opera*(Mariinskly/Kirov Theatre).

#23 leonid

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Posted 06 May 2006 - 04:59 PM

both diaghilev and nijinsky literature should have various mentions of fokine's NARCISSE. frequently there are illustrations showing at least one photo of nijinsky in the title role and various bakst sketches of the costumes for the surrounding characters.

Narcisse (: Chor: Mikhail Fokin; mus: Nikolai Cherepnin; lib: Léon Bakst and Nikolai Cherepnin after Ovid; scen & cos: Léon Bakst. First perf: Monaco: Monte Carlo, Théâtre de Monte Carlo, Apr 26, 1911, Les Ballets Russes (Dyagilev).//First American perf: New York, Metropolitan Opera House, week of April 22, 1916, Les Ballets Russes (Dyagilev)


The 'Animated Gobelin' scene from this ballet was first given on the 15th April 1907. The ballet was subsequently performed in its entirety at the Mariinsky Theatre on the 25th November, 25 1907. The first western performance took place at the Chatelet Theatre on the 15th May 1909. As I have mentioned elsewhere it was again revived in Russia in 1923.

#24 missvjc420

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Posted 18 May 2006 - 09:18 PM

Perhaps Gina Ness will share some of her memories of learning some material from this ballet; she spoke of learning it on another thread, either here or on BT4D. I would love to hear of this or be able to learn the choreography myself. I love to hear stories of dances handed down, it's one of the most beautiful things about the world of ballet. :wub:

#25 Anthony_NYC

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Posted 19 May 2006 - 12:22 PM

More and more stuff is actually staying in print nowadays, it's just you have to figure out what form it's in and where to find it, which can be quite a challenge!

The Marco Polo recording of "Pavillon d'Armide" is actually still available, via Naxos Music Library, a subscription streaming service. If you're in the U.S., it's possible you have access to this at home compliments of your library (check your library's website or give them a call).

The recording of "Narcisse et Echo" came out on Chandos. That label now sells everything in its catalog online as a download. Here's a direct link to the Tcherepnin.

It's a big orchestra for "Pavillon":

3 flutes (3rd doubling on piccolo)
2 oboes
1 English horn
2 clarinets
1 bass clarinet
2 bassoons
1 contrabassoon
4 horns
3 trumpets
3 trombones
1 tuba
timpani
percussion (cymbals, triangle, bass drum, snare drum, side drum, glockenspiel, xylophone)
2 harps
celesta
The usual complement of strings

You can rent the performance materials for this and lots of other Nikolai Tcherepnin pieces from C.F. Peters.

#26 Solor

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Posted 20 May 2006 - 01:19 PM

For those that have the Chandos recording of 'Pavillon', what music is used for the famous Pas de Trois and the Nijinsky variation? The liner notes and the track listings give no indication of this.

#27 phenby

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Posted 21 May 2006 - 08:29 PM

For those that have the Chandos recording of 'Pavillon', what music is used for the famous Pas de Trois and the Nijinsky variation? The liner notes and the track listings give no indication of this.


Solar
I don't have access to my copy of the CD presently but my recollection is that it followed the score.

May I take this opportunity to voice my complaint against all recording companies which produce ballet recordings and then fail to reproduce the libretto in the liner notes (just about always the case!).

PHENBY


LE PAVILLON D’ARMIDE

Ballet en trois tableaux.

Poème d’Alexandre Benois.

Chorégraphie de Michel Fokine

Musique de N. TCHEREPNINE.


[snip]

Edited by carbro, 21 May 2006 - 09:03 PM.


#28 davidl

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 01:37 PM

Hello All

David Lewiston calling from Maui. Listening to the complete version of "Pavillon" on Hawaii Public Radio as I write. Gorgeous score, but too many rice krispies (snaps crackles & pops). I'll have to ask whether it's an LP when it's over.

A *very* long time ago (late '50s or early '60s) I met Sascha T in the New York apartment of Olga de Hartmann, the widow of Thomas de Hartmann, which whom I studied composition in the early '50s until his death in April '56. Lovely chap, de H.

I've been wondering for the longest time what happened to de Hartmann's score for the "Red Flower" ballet, which was mounted at the Maryinsky. Does anyone here have a clue?

Salutations, David Lewiston

#29 carbro

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 08:55 PM

Hi, davidl from Maui (which sounds even more tempting than usual on this 20-something degree day). I hope someone can answer your question, even though it sounds extremely arcane to me. But who knows? We do have some very knowledgeable members!

Meanwhile, I hope you've been browsing our board and will contribute as other topics spark your interest. And please feel free to introduce yourself in our Welcome forum.

#30 rg

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 05:12 AM

not sure what you mean by 'what happened to':
do you mean does anyone have a copy of the score these days?
or, has anyone ever used it again for a ballet?

here is what the NYPLibrary for the Perf. Arts dance divison lists of the ballet's beginnings:

Beauty and the beast : Original title: Alen'kii tsvetochek. Chor: Nikolai Legat; mus: Thomas Hartmann; lib: Pavel Marzhetzkii after the story by Sergei Aksakov; scen: Konstantin Korovin. First perf: St. Petersburg, Maryinsky Theater, Dec 16, 1907 (O.S.).

RED FLOWER was the original title of the work (see: "Alen'kii tsvetochek" "Red Flower" in Russian i believe, above).
It would seem also that the work was given at Moscow's Bolshoi Theatre subsequently - at one point i posted a scan of Geltser and Tikhomirov in the ballet from Moscow.
Still, as noted, i'm unsure about just what your query means.


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