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2006-07 season


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#1 Dale

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 01:00 PM

An official release I received on the 2006-07 season:

PENNSYLVANIA BALLET ANNOUNCES ITS 2006 – 2007 SEASON

October 2006 – June 2007
The Academy of Music  The Merriam Theater

Pennsylvania Ballet’s Artistic Director Roy Kaiser announced today details of the thrilling 2006–2007 season, featuring passionate and enthralling programs, from the Company’s first all-Robbins triple-bill, to two contemporary Company Premieres and the 38th annual production of Philadelphia’s beloved holiday tradition, George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker.
“I am excited to announce today Pennsylvania Ballet’s 43rd Season,” said Mr. Kaiser. “Our dancers are renowned for their diversity and talent, and this season showcases their unique abilities through classic and contemporary masterpieces, including four programs at the Academy of Music and two at the Merriam Theater. In addition, I am thrilled that we are able to add three new works to our repertoire: Jerome Robbins’ In the Night, Twyla Tharp’s In the Upper Room and Val Caniparoli’s Lambarena.”

PENNSYLVANIA BALLET’S 2006 – 2006 SEASON:
 Romance and Revelry: An Evening of Dance by Jerome Robbins
Fancy Free (Music: Leonard Bernstein)
In the Night* (Music: Frederic Chopin)
The Concert (Music: Frederic Chopin)
October 11 – 15, 2006
Academy of Music
(*Company Premiere!)

Jerome Robbins is world-renowned for his choreography for ballets, theater, film and television. Pennsylvania Ballet presents its first all-Robbins tribute from October 11 to 15 at the Academy of Music. The program opens with the Company Premiere of In the Night, a ballet set to a selection of Chopin nocturnes which explores three stages of a relationship in three extended pas de deux — from a tender young love to a mature relationship and, finally, a passionate affair. Also on the program is the return of Fancy Free, a playful piece which has three sailors courting two beautiful girls on a hot summer night in the city, and The Concert, a hysterical ballet which examines the straying thoughts of audience members gathered to hear a Chopin piano concert.

 An Evening of Audience Favorites
October 13, 2006
Academy of Music
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In conjunction with Pennsylvania Ballet’s annual fall gala, the Company presents a spectacular Evening of Audience Favorites, showcasing the talent and skill of Pennsylvania Ballet’s Principals and Soloists. Single ticket prices for this performance will be announced shortly, as will program details. Subscribers will receive a 10% discount off of single tickets prices.

 The Nutcracker
(Choreography: George Balanchine; Music: Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky)
December 9 – 31, 2006
Academy of Music

The greatest holiday tradition returns to the Academy of Music from December 9 to 31 when Pennsylvania Ballet presents George Balanchine’s spectacular production of The Nutcracker. The Company’s annual holiday celebration has delighted generations of audiences in Philadelphia for 38 years. Featuring the original Tchaikovsky score performed by the Pennsylvania Ballet Orchestra and the Philadelphia Boys Choir, extravagant sets and costumes, and spellbinding character dances, The Nutcracker is a tradition shared by more than 50,000 children and adults each season.

 Giselle
(Choreography: Marius Petipa; Music: Adolphe Adam)
February 2 – 10, 2007
Merriam Theater

Marius Petipa’s beloved version of Giselle returns to Pennsylvania Ballet from February 2 to 10 at the Merriam Theater. With libretto by Therophile Gautier and choreography after Jean Coralli and Jules Perrot, this is one of the world’s most beloved ballets. Set in the vineyard country bordering the Rhine, Giselle tells the story of a young prince who disguises himself as a commoner to win the affection of a peasant girl. Set to a captivating score by Adolphe Adam (orchestrated by John Lanchberry), Giselle is the epitome of romantic ballet, telling the poignant tale of unrequited love, remorse and forgiveness. It is also the oldest continually performed ballet, having had its World Premiere in 1841 at the Theatre de l’Academie Royale de Musique in Paris.

 Carmina Burana (Music: Carl Orff)
with Serenade (Choreography: George Balanchine; Music: Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky)
March 8 – 17, 2007
Academy of Music

Passion ignites Philadelphia when Pennsylvania Ballet presents Carmina Burana, a choral/theatrical work based on a collection of 13th-century songs, from March 8 to 17 at the Academy of Music. Composed and arranged by Carl Orff, the production is a three-part collaboration between dancers, singers and the orchestra, consisting of three major sections: “Spring,” “In the Tavern” and “The Court of Love”. Carmina Burana is a sensual work which addresses a wide range of human emotions and stages of life: from innocence to passion and from simple pleasures to worldly possessions. It’s rejection, intense anger, and finally resolution and release as the wheel of fortune spins out each fate.
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Also on the program is George Balanchine’s Serenade, which originated as a teaching tool for an evening class in stage technique at the School of American Ballet. The movement and music of this work give the piece great meaning. Set to Tchaikovsky’s Serenade in C Major, Balanchine choreographed and first presented the ballet with the producing company of the School of American Ballet at the Avery Memorial Theatre in Hartford, Connecticut in1934.

 Modern Masters
In the Upper Room* (Choreography: Twyla Tharp; Music: Phillip Glass)
Continuum (Choreography: Christopher Wheeldon; Music: Györgi Ligeti)
Lambarena* (Choreography: Val Caniparoli; Music: Johann Sebastian Bach and traditional African)
April 25 – 29, 2007
Merriam Theater
(*Company Premieres!)

Pennsylvania Ballet celebrates Modern Masters with a diverse and contemporary program from April 25 to 29 at the Merriam Theater which opens with the Company Premiere of Twyla Tharp’s In the Upper Room. Set to a thundering original score by Philip Glass, In the Upper Room consists of nine segments and has 10 dancers (bathed in black, white and accents of ruby) performing intricate foot work and enthusiastic pumps and jabs from the boxing world. Originally performed by Tharp’s own company in 1986, this is the second Tharp piece acquired by Pennsylvania Ballet: The Company presented Nine Sinatra Songs during the 2004 – 2005 Season.

The program also includes the Company Premiere of Lambarena, Val Caniparoli’s moving fusion of baroque classicism with traditional African dance. Inspired by a score of the same name that blends traditional African rhythms and melodies with passages from Johann Sebastian Bach, the ballet includes eight movements that merge the classic dance vocabulary with movements African inspired movements. Lambarena was originally created for San Francisco Ballet in 1995.

Christopher Wheeldon’s Continuum returns to conclude this moving program. Set to an arrhythmic score for piano and harpsichord by the Hungarian composer Györgi Ligeti, the series of 12 dance episodes, danced by four couples, was inspired by the emotional aftermath of September 11. The choreography, which is linear and geometric, includes a number of difficult lifts and extensions.

 The Sleeping Beauty
(Choreography: Marius Petipa; Music: Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky)
June 1 – 9
Academy of Music

Returning to Pennsylvania Ballet after a five-year absence and closing out the 2006 – 2007 Season is Marius Petipa’s beautiful The Sleeping Beauty, with music by Tchaikovsky and additional choreography and staging by Janek Schergen, after tales by Charles Perrault. The Company first performed this production in May 1997. The tale is a classic: The Sleeping Beauty (a baby princess named Aurora) is condemned at her christening by an evil fairy to prick her finger and die on her 16th birthday. But, in a
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twist of fate, the good Lilac Fairy steps forth and declares that the princess will only sleep until awakened by the kiss of a prince. The artistry of The Sleeping Beauty — an audience favorite — is as mesmerizing today as it was 100 years ago.
Subscriptions are available by calling 215.551.7000 or online at www.paballet.org.
Full season subscription prices range from $92.50 to $447.80. Subscribers receive many benefits over single ticket purchasers including priority seating, flexible payment plan, easy ticket exchanges, discounts to fine restaurants and other area cultural institutions, advance ticket purchasing for The Nutcracker and more! There are special discount subscriptions for groups of 10 or more, as well as the Thursday Night Jumps! series, specifically designed for young professionals ages 21 to 35.
Pennsylvania Ballet also offers a Family Matinee Series which includes a free Family Day event on the day of the show. Family Day is a fun-filled celebration featuring entertainment, games and craft activities, as well as autograph opportunities with some of the featured dancers. The Family Matinee Series performances this season are as follows: The Nutcracker on Saturday, December 16, Giselle on Saturday, February 10 and The Sleeping Beauty on Saturday, June 2.
For more information or to subscribe to Pennsylvania Ballet’s 2006 – 2007 Season, please call 215.551.7000 or order online at www.paballet.org.
Founded in 1963 by George Balanchine student Barbara Weisberger, Pennsylvania Ballet is one of the nation’s leading ballet companies. Headquartered in Philadelphia, the Company’s annual local season features six productions of classic favorites and new works, including the Philadelphia holiday tradition, The Nutcracker. For more information, call 215.551.7000 or visit www.paballet.org.

#2 GWTW

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 01:40 PM

Wow - the corps will be getting an intensive workout next season with Nutcracker, Serenade, Giselle and Sleeping Beauty.

Has anyone seen PA Ballet's Giselle and Sleeping Beauty?

#3 socalgal

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 04:39 PM

This is an interesting season for PABallet. Glad to see a new Robbins acquisition for them (In the Night) and also the Tharp piece. Sad to see less Balanchine however. "Serenade" is one of my favorites that will make a great night of dancing coupled with "Carmina Burana." I am wondering if the "Carmina Burana" is the Butler version that they have performed in the past or a new one. It does not mention the name of the choreographer. I have seen the Teltley version on PAB which was amazing and wears well for its age.

PAB's "The Sleeping Beauty" is a lovely version and has beautiful production values.
It is a very classical and traditional and with staging by Janek Schergen when I saw it in '02. I have never seen their "Giselle".

What is "Lambarena" like? I have seen photos of this ballet and it looks colorful.

The corps will be busy, but so will everyone! I am excited to see "The Concert" again and will be looking forward to the PAB dancers in "In the Upper Room" which to me is a physical marathon!

PAB will be showing their best next year......an ambitious season that will do them proud.

#4 Leigh Witchel

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 05:02 PM

An official release I received on the 2006-07 season:

PENNSYLVANIA BALLET ANNOUNCES ITS 2006 – 2007 SEASON

 Giselle
(Choreography: Marius Petipa; Music: Adolphe Adam)
February 2 – 10, 2007
Merriam Theater


<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Two words.

Julie Diana. That's a no-brainer to me.

#5 Amy Reusch

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 08:01 PM

I am wondering if the "Carmina Burana" is the Glen Tetley version that they have performed in the past or a new one.


Have they switched from John Butler's to Glen Tetley's? When did that happen?

#6 socalgal

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 11:14 PM

opps! Amy you are right. It was the Butler version of Carmina that I saw. I will edit my post!

#7 pugbee

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 07:19 AM

The Giselle in rep is quite traditional as well. It's a nice production! Honestly, the choreography of their Sleeping Beauty is not always my favorite. (Poor Lilac Fairy has to do that awful fouette arabesque, tempsleve series at the end of her variation.) Some of the other fairy variations are a bit uncomfortable, IMO. But the dancers are sure to be good nonetheless, and the sets and costumes are fantastic!! I'm wondering if Tamara Hadley will be Carabosse.... She's great in that role. (Gloria Govrin also performed that part when I was there!!)

#8 socalgal

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Posted 28 February 2006 - 08:03 AM

WOW! Boy, would I have loved to have seen Gloria Govrin play Carabosse! That grand presence and tall stature.....

Regarding the fairy variations.....I thought them quite standard to other versions I have seen actually. And the Lilac Fairy step you describe can be breathtaking when executed with musicality and extension. Sometimes I did feel, as in other ballets they dance, that they needed a wider stage as some of the ensemble dancing looked cramped.

#9 pugbee

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Posted 01 March 2006 - 06:17 AM

True -- even though they are on the nice, big Academy stage, the scenery can eat up quite a bit of dancing room.


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