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The Three Bolshoi Graces


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#16 Kevin Ng

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Posted 28 May 2001 - 01:16 AM

Lovebird, please call me Kevin by the way. I don't know who the two Russian founders of the National Ballet of China are, (Hu Xinxin should know) but it can't be Nadezhda Pavlova who would have been too young when the company was established in China.

#17 vrsfanatic

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Posted 28 May 2001 - 07:38 AM

Lovebird, Pyotr Gusev and his wife, Valentina Rumyanseva, from Kirov helped to found the school in Beijing in 1954 and Shanghai,1960. There also was someone from Bolshoi involved, Viktor Tsalpin I think.

#18 Terry

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Posted 28 May 2001 - 05:09 PM

IMO, one word to describe Maximova is that she is absolutely "charming." We say a lot of dancers are "charming" today, but her level of charm can't be found amongst many dancers.

#19 Hu Xinxin

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Posted 29 May 2001 - 08:43 PM

I woulld like to answer your question about the Chinese ballet.
Pyoty Gusev was surely a great man in China's ballet history, but we don't think he was the founder of NBC.
The first director of the company is Dai Ai Lian, known as the mother of the Chinese ballet. She was born in Trinidad-Tobago born and trained at the Rambert and came back to China around 1940 to join the war against the Japanese.
Actually it was some Russian people who brought us classical ballet much earlier. They came to China after the October Revolution (in 1918?),some of them were teaching ballet to make their lives.
In 1954, after the founding of the Peoples Republic of China, the first ever official dance school (known now as Beijing Dance Academy) was established in Beijing. This dance school at that time had invited 6 Russian ballet experts to teach at the school, among them was Pyoty Gusev, who has made great contribution to ballet development in China. The Russian experts trained the first generation of teachers, dancers and choreographers of ballet in China, who successfully performed the first classical full-length ballet--SWAN LAKE in Beijing in 1958.
In 1959, a company was found at the Academy. Dai Ai Lian was the first director. Later the company separated from the academy and was named the Central Ballet of China by the government. The English name of the company changed in late 1990s to 'the National Ballet of China'. But we usually call it its Chinese name 'the Central Ballet'.
Sorry for my late reply. Thanks.

[ 05-29-2001: Message edited by: Hu Xinxin ]

[ 05-29-2001: Message edited by: Hu Xinxin ]

#20 Hu Xinxin

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Posted 29 May 2001 - 09:37 PM

To Lovebird:
I guess the "Pavlova" Chen Yan talked about was Anna Pavlova. I heard Anna was in Shanghai and taught ballet there in the early days.

BTW, I don't like Natalia Bessmertnova very much. I saw her many times when Bolshoi toured Tokyo in 1988. I had expected to see Nina Annaniashvili, but it was always Bessmertnova. She was too old, but appeared everywhere in Swan Lake, Giselle and Spartacus.
I think Nadezhda Pavlova came to China 1989 or 1990 and danced Spartacut with Muhamedov. Muhamedov did a great job (much better than he did in Japan), but she was not very impressive.
FYI.

[ 05-29-2001: Message edited by: Hu Xinxin ]

#21 Lovebird

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Posted 29 May 2001 - 10:33 PM

Xinxin,you saw them when they were past their prime and their technique was probably not as good as when they were younger.I do agree with you,though,that they should noy have put Bessmertnova in so many performances when other,younger talents could have been put in some of them.

#22 Melissa

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Posted 30 May 2001 - 02:37 PM

In the early-mid 80's, I saw a film of Pavlova dancing pas de deux from Don Q, Giselle and Sleeping Beauty. She was a brilliant technician, with high extensions and extraordinary, swivel-like pirouettes that looked effortless. Her Giselle was particularly lovely in it's lyricism, and she displayed a natural musicality which was very appealing.

Melissa


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