Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Stranded in Multiplex Hell


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#16 Mme. Hermine

Mme. Hermine

    Emeralds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,793 posts

Posted 29 August 2005 - 04:30 AM

I was actually in a library on the North Fork (Greenport) where some teens had come to use the free internet. The computers were in a central area in the library, right next to the main reading room, and not able to be closed off. They were loud and raucous (not just talking quietly), and when I complained to the librarian that I was being disturbed, I was told that if they were told to keep quiet then they might stop coming and the library didn't want that!

#17 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,952 posts

Posted 29 August 2005 - 10:17 AM

The audiences in my area are pretty well behaved, and I've rarely experienced too much talking. The comments I do hear can even be enlightening in a way -- I remember a couple behind us on one occasion who were completely flummoxed by the nonlinear storytelling of Pulp Fiction, and it was pretty funny to hear. ("Isn't he dead?" etc.)

I can think of many reasons to criticize the theatres, but a night out at the movies is still one of the least expensive entertainment options available for those who want to get out of the house. (The concessions are pricey but concessions are pricey everywhere, and that's how they make their money -- if the theatres relied on ticket sales alone, they'd be out of business in no time. However, ticket prices have not gone above ten dollars around here.)

I would actually be willing to pay more for a civilized experience at the multiplex, if such could be guaranteed......

#18 Estelle

Estelle

    Platinum Circle

  • Foreign Correspondent
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,706 posts

Posted 29 August 2005 - 10:28 AM

(The concessions are pricey but concessions are pricey everywhere, and that's how they make their money -- if the theatres relied on ticket sales alone, they'd be out of business in no time.  However, ticket prices have not gone above ten dollars around here.)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Err, could someone please explain what "concessions" are ? Is it things which are sold in some cinemas like pop-corn, ice-creams, etc. ? (The French word "concession" generally is related to graveyards, but I suspect it has nothing to do with the English one in that context
:huh: )

#19 carbro

carbro

    Late Board Registrar

  • Rest in Peace
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,361 posts

Posted 29 August 2005 - 11:07 AM

Err, could someone please explain what "concessions" are ? Is it things which are sold in some cinemas like pop-corn, ice-creams, etc. ?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Exactly that!

(The French word "concession" generally is related to graveyards, but I suspect it has nothing to do with the English one in that context  :huh: )

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Perhaps the nutrition people who have warned against deadly movie-house buttered popcorn were onto something! :wink:

#20 Estelle

Estelle

    Platinum Circle

  • Foreign Correspondent
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,706 posts

Posted 29 August 2005 - 12:50 PM

Thanks for your reply, carbro !

There are more and more multiplexes in France too, but fortunately there still is a decent number of not too big cinemas and small "artistic" ones... I do miss the cinemas of the Quartier Latin in Paris, because there is so much choice there and always a lot of good old films to see (well, even just having the three ones of the rue des écoles / rue Champollion would be fine for me :grinning-smiley-001: ) but the cinemas in Lyon are not too bad, and there is one which shows some movies a few months after they've been released with tickets at 5 euros... One problem sometimes it that it can be difficult in cities outside Paris to see movies with subtitles instead of dubbing (and my husband hates dubbing).

#21 Ed Waffle

Ed Waffle

    Bronze Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 493 posts

Posted 07 September 2005 - 09:54 PM

Here in the suburbs of Motown (there are all of two movie theaters with a grand total of 12 screens within the city limits of Detroit) we usually hit the first showing of a film on the weekends or occasionally an early evening show during the week after work. This allows us to avoid the crowds of boors on weekend evenings.

We have had the same type of experience as Helene describes, and it always seems to be the husband who doesn’t understand what is happening on the screen. I assume that people like that simply go to the movies to have something to do, since they obviously can’t be enjoying watching it.

We had an odd experience a number of years ago at a Sunday afternoon screening of “Crossing Delancey”. The theater was in a Jewish neighborhood and much of the audience were elderly women. They thought that Peter Riegert would have been a perfect grandson-in-law—either for Bubbie Kantor or themselves and didn’t mind talking about it. When his character said to Amy Irving “I’ll say a brucha for you” half the audience let out an audible sigh. So there was a lot of noise behind us—the theater was crowded and we sat toward the front—but because it was so specific to the movie and so gently well-intentioned it didn’t bother us at all.

Those who don’t know “Crossing Delancey” can find out more here: http://imdb.com/titl...094921/combined


Several years ago a sparkling new print of “Belle de Jour” was released to theaters as part of a marketing campaign for the DVD. Never missing a chance to see Catherine Deneuve, we were at the theater on Saturday. Lovely movie, of course. As we were leaving we heard the couple behind us talking—one said “That Catherine Deneuve is amazing. She’s been in the movies for years and she doesn’t look a day over thirty”, apparently not realizing that they had just watched a film from about 30 years before.

#22 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,952 posts

Posted 08 September 2005 - 09:45 AM

Nice to hear from you, Ed. "Crossing Delancey" is a cute movie -- maybe a little too cute. As I watched, however, I couldn’t help reflecting that the lady who chooses the pickle guy was played by the former Mrs. Steven Spielberg, recipient of what was then and maybe still is the biggest settlement in history, and would Isabelle be able to afford all those cute little ensembles she wears with Pickle Man’s income.....:off topic:

#23 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,471 posts

Posted 08 September 2005 - 11:30 AM

Nice to hear from you, Ed. "Crossing Delancey" is a cute movie -- maybe a little too cute.  As I watched, however, I couldn’t help reflecting that the lady who chooses the pickle guy was played by the former Mrs. Steven Spielberg, recipient of what was then and maybe still is the biggest settlement in history, and would Isabelle be able to afford all those cute little ensembles she wears with Pickle Man’s income.....:off topic:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Peter Riegert was a little too perfect, too, but I loved him anyway.

Forget about affording those cut little ensembles on a Pickle Man's income -- how about affording those outfits by working in a bookstore and paying rent in NYC?


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):