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salariesNYCB and BT for example


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#46 vrsfanatic

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Posted 12 December 2007 - 03:23 AM

...ABT recently voted to join AGMA so when they draw and ratify a contract it should be available online, probably next fall or winter.


ABT had been a member of AGMA however left AGMA, forming their own union years ago. I am not clear on the history of when it joined and the exact year it left AGMA. My guess is 1980 something when it left AGMA. I can still see the photo of the dancers carrying picket signs in the NYTimes. It is interesting to read that they have voted to return to AGMA under an administration that voted to leave it.

Oh the circle of life! :(

#47 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 December 2007 - 04:42 AM

I remember that too, and thought the time frame was earlier, but this comes from a December 1994 article by Robert Johnson in Dance Magazine:

The dancers and stagehands of American Ballet Theatre (ABT) have made a daring move that is sure to be recorded in the annals of the labor movement in the United States of America. Taking their fate into their own hands, the dancers have broken with the American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA) to form their own union, Independent Artists of America (IAA).

The change was made following an election last summer, in which the members of ABT's bargaining unit voted to leave AGMA and join IAA. The vote was thirty-eight for IAA, versus three for AGMA, with fifteen votes contested. Fifty-six members of the seventy-five-member bargaining unit participated in the election, which was held the week after ABT's Metropolitan Opera season closed in June.



#48 vrsfanatic

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Posted 12 December 2007 - 05:04 AM

Well gollybee! Now I am getting old. Funny, I thought my late husband was still with ABT at the time of the strike, but in 1994 we were not in the US at all. :(

#49 ggobob

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Posted 12 December 2007 - 07:07 AM

My memory is that in 1980 or so the ABT dancers went on strike...that was when the Labor Day march was led by danceers and the photo appeared in the Times. There was a lot of grumbling that the union didn't support the dancers to the level expected.

Later the dancers decided to form their own union. It was the 1980s action that began the upward climb in salaries, per diems, etc. I seem to remember that another item on the agenda was the care/cleaning of costumes. At one point the dancers reps hung costumes in the room during bargaining and the session ended early because of the power of the smell.

#50 vrsfanatic

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Posted 12 December 2007 - 08:01 AM

Thank you for that memory! :wallbash: I do recall that my late husband was still a member of AGMA in 1991, his final year with ABT, so the change in unions must have been after that. I had confused the two events. :(

#51 bart

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Posted 12 December 2007 - 08:09 AM

Thanks to Ed McPherson and others for reviving this thread. I'd like to thank sz as well, for including information about one of the smaller companies.

I'm not suprised by the high earning potential of the top principals of New York's leading companies -- or the protections and guarantees that lower-ranked dancers in these companies are now achieving. They dserve it all -- and mroe.

It's the many dancers in smaller companies that worry me. Such companies (and there are many of them) not only have difficulty raising funds -- they have to try to raise funds consistently, year after yeer, which is a requirement for long-term budgeting commitments.

Any information (official and verifiable, of course) that you can give us about the position of dancers in these less prominent, less financially secure companies would be appreciated! :(

#52 USArtist1331

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Posted 01 August 2013 - 10:27 PM

does anyone know any income ifo for small companies like ballet Arkansas?



#53 ABT Fan

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 01:06 PM

DanceMagazine lists salaries in their "Jobs Guide" editions (not for every single ballet co. though).  Try searching on dancemagazine.com.

 

I'm sure there are other more up-to-date ways to find this out that others can suggest.



#54 Razor

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 08:11 AM

http://www.examiner....na-guest-artist

 

 

Theater dance job #2: Principal Ballerina/Guest Artist
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Theater dance job #2: Principal Ballerina/Guest ArtistLONDON, ENGLAND - AUGUST 03: Anais Chalendard of the English National Ballet performs during a dress rehearsal of Swan Lake(Photo by Ian Gavan/Getty Images)

While the average classical ballet dancer in New York City can earn an annual salary of $72,000 this represents a combined average between rehearsal, performance and any earned overtime pay totaling $1500/week as dictated through the American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA) contract.

In comparison a Principal New York City ballet dancer can earn over $2,300 for performance weeks, and approximately $1,900 for rehearsal weeks. Since dancers are also eligible for overtime compensation per AGMA contract, an additional $22 -$88/hour can be earned depending on the number of overtime hours and whether it is a performance or rehearsal week. All of this can bring a principal dancer a combined annual salary in New York to over $100,000.

A more famous ballet dancer, who guest-stars with major companies, may earn even more: between $3,000 and $5,000 per performance.

New York Times: What New Yorkers Make,Salary of a New York Principal Dancer

 



#55 Razor

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 06:13 PM

An acclaimed ballet dancer earns more than a dancer who is not recognized. "New York Magazine" reports that as of 2011, experienced dancers in the New York City Ballet earned around $1,500 per week. A more famous ballet dancer, who guest-stars with major companies, may earn between $3,000 and $5,000 per performance. Also, dancers receive higher pay for performances than for rehearsals as performances pose extraordinary risks. As of 2005, a principal dancer in the New York City Ballet earned $1,743 for a rehearsal week and $2,060 for a performance week, according to Ballet Alert and the American Guild of Musical Artists.

 

http://www.ehow.com/...l#ixzz2xsagZdrH

 

 

If guestimated calculations are accurate, $1500 divided by near 72 hour work weeks (12 hour days, multiplied by 6 days) that would average at $21 per hour for the experienced dancers.... maybe someone else can do a better job at math.   For those principals who have been sent elsewhere to guest-appear, I would be curious to see what kind of financial compensation they really get.....especially if it is Europe, Asia, Russia, etc.



#56 Helene

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 08:19 PM

It isn't clear whether they're talking about base salaries or overtime.  NYCB dancers can earn a lot of money in overtime once the injuries start piling up toward the end of a demanding season.



#57 Razor

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 11:20 PM

That would most likely be during Xmas/Nutcracker season, wouldn't it?

#58 Helene

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 02:03 AM

I remember Spring Seasons where the substitution insert was almost as long as the program.



#59 sandik

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 08:40 AM

End of season performances are often an exercise in creative casting. 



#60 Razor

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 05:23 PM

Sandik, can you elaborate?

 

They must be running on fumes if there is even Sunday rehearsals.....




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