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salariesNYCB and BT for example


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#16 Dansuer85

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 03:34 PM

From my experience, being in a company and from my friends experinces where they are,the average mid-sized company has a starting pay of $450-$550 and then it doesn't really go up too much after that. If you are a star dancer and have been there a few years you could make between $700-$900. I know some dancers who've been with a company 5-6 years and still make under $600 dollars! Now what the company offers as extras(which shouldn't be considered extras) varies greatly. I would say the majority of your known mid-sized companies provide, Health Insurance and Physical Therapist and the such, but some don't have ANY of that! Just workmans Compensation. Also dancers have to deal with when they are layed off being on Unemployment which also varies from state to state. Some its not even half your salary, others it's almost what you make a week. Then there is dealing with unemployment while trying to do other jobs, as in teaching or performing, but not losing your unemployment.... :clapping:

What we do for the love of our art! :beg: It's ok money isn't everything and I think dancers tend to be happy knowing they are doing what they love and being surronded by such great people, mostly!

#17 Tiffany

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 08:36 PM

Yes, most dancers are not employed for a full year. In the U.S., I would definitely say that dancers dance for the love of it and nothing else, because they would certainly make more in other jobs. I think that the situation is better in Europe, where they have more respect, more touring (which could also be viewed negatively), and maybe more money proportionately though less than what they would make here. I know of a few dancers that have to have second jobs to make ends meet here in the states. I wonder if that happens as much in Europe?

there are also companies that provide a stipend once a dancer retires. I doubt that I will see that offered during my lifetime in the US, if it is EVER offered!

#18 DancingPixie

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 09:15 AM

This is a bit of an aside, but I was in Romania last year and the ballet in Bucharest was lovely. But the tickets were so cheap that I kept wondering how much do dancers in less economically powerful countries earn? I'm guessing the pay in Russia would be good, but what about elsewhere in eastern europe for example?

#19 Marga

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 10:01 AM

.....but what about elsewhere in eastern europe for example?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Here is my post earlier in this thread. It is indicative of many European countries.

Estonian Ballet dancer's salary

The dancers in Russia earn even less.

#20 sandik

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 10:31 AM

At the recent meeting of Dance/USA, in a session about dancers transitioning out of performing and into second careers, a dancer from Ballet Austin spoke about a "Job Bank" program they have matching dancers skills with temporary jobs during their layoff periods (everything from manual labor and car washing up to more skilled work) His comment was that it made his career as a performer affordable.

#21 GWTW

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 10:31 AM

I would caution against comparing salaries in different countries. It's really comparing apples and oranges.
I am not a dancer, but just as an example, I am presently earning in the US a salary which is below average in my profession for someone with my experience, credentials, etc., however it is still MUCH more than I was earning at home where my salary was above average.
Of course, this disparity in salaries is not a problem as far as I'm concerned. :dunno:
Obviously, it's more problematic for Americans who go abroad, as Marga's posts demonstrate.

#22 Helene

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 07:38 AM

In the General Reading & Literature forum, balletbooster brings to our attention a book called Mozart in the Jungle - Sex Drugs & Classical Music.

While much of the hype about this book focuses on the wild times in the classical music world of the seventies, the focus of the interview was on Tindall's research into the disparity between the salaries of performers and artistic directors, conductors, etc. She includes the ballet world in her discussion, as there are many similarities in the way artists are treated across the board in many of the performing arts. This is all part of the book, but it is not getting the press time that the more titillating subject matter is receiving.



http://ballettalk.in...topic=19984&hl=

#23 Anne74

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 11:10 AM

At the recent meeting of Dance/USA, in a session about dancers transitioning out of performing and into second careers, a dancer from Ballet Austin spoke about a "Job Bank" program they have matching dancers skills with temporary jobs during their layoff periods (everything from manual labor and car washing up to more skilled work)  His comment was that it made his career as a performer affordable.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


The saddest thing about this whole discussion, to me, is that classical artists who have spent as many years training in their field as a surgeon have to resort to taking side jobs washing cars to make ends meet. Does anyone think this country will ever see a time when classical dancers can realisticly expect to be hired to perform year round?

#24 studio company

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Posted 06 July 2005 - 04:54 PM

Do the companies provide health insurance, dental insurance etc.? I know that they provide free pointe shoes. (which is a must considering how many they go through in their career)

It seems like doctor bills would take most of their money since the average dancer has a humble pay.

#25 carbro

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Posted 06 July 2005 - 08:20 PM

Some do, some can't. In this case (AGMA), you can find it in the contract.

#26 Anne74

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Posted 07 July 2005 - 04:18 PM

I believe that all but the smallest semi-professional ballet companies provide at least some form of health insurance-- how much of the premiums they cover is another story. As for the pointe shoe question, yes, they are almost always provided, but the number of pairs allotted per dancer per week may be quite limited. Only the luckiest dancers have the luxury of an unlimited pointe shoe allowance. And I will add that "maintenance" bodywork and medical attention does indeed eat up a lot of a ballet dancer's already meager salary. Massage, chiropractic, acupuncture, etc. are rarely fully covered by a health insurance plan and are important (in fact, indispensible) to a dancer past the age of 21!

#27 leibling

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Posted 07 July 2005 - 04:36 PM

Usually, in the Spring, both Pointe and Dancemagazine have special issues in which US and some European companies list the starting salaries, number of weeks, and benefits. This could be a good reference. Generally, I have noticed that the "mid-range" reginal companies usually are able to offer a minimum of 30-36 weeks, starting around 400-500 dollars, along with some form of health insurance.

#28 Giselle05

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Posted 07 July 2005 - 04:46 PM

Is there anywhere you can find the data on salaries over at ABT?

#29 emhbunhead

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Posted 07 July 2005 - 09:41 PM

some companies dont provide any health coverage at all.. and minimal pointe shoes

#30 dcportrait

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Posted 08 July 2005 - 05:43 AM

Is there anywhere you can find the data on salaries over at ABT?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Yes, I was curious as to their salaries, as well.
:mellow:


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