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Oscar nominations announced


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#31 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2005 - 03:20 PM

Old Fashioned, it isnt so much a health issue, Id suggest, as a double standard where looks are concerned. The women tend to be kept to a rail-thin ideal (except for huge breasts and lips, which are encouraged), while men like Travolta and Tom Hanks heedlessly sport their double chins, and others display crows feet and gray hair without self-consciousness.


Also, mens foreheads still move. (They replayed Halle Berrys hyper-emotional acceptance speech, and while the rest of her face was working, all activity ceased at her eyebrows. It was really odd to see.)

#32 Old Fashioned

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Posted 01 March 2005 - 03:48 PM

That's pretty much what I'm talking about. But look at the ballet world- dancers are kept to an even stricter standard. How is it any different? Rarely do I hear of someone complaining of a dancer being too thin, but one displays even the teensiest extra amount of flesh, they're considered not having the correct body type.

Poor actresses. They are criticized for being too thin (yes, this does occur quite often actually. Think Lara Flynn Boyle) and too fat.

#33 carbro

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Posted 01 March 2005 - 04:57 PM

Is it necessary for a woman to achieve the Lara Flynn Boyle standard before she's considered too thin? That's pretty extreme! I often see dancers (of both sexes) whom I'd love to feed a big dinner. The ultra-starved aesthetic is totally out of whack. I'm rather appalled by how readily the women (and some men, too, but generally at a later age) subject themselves to the knife in the name of stopping time. Isn't Joan Rivers a pathetic joke??? So much silicone in her lips, she could barely enunciate!

#34 dirac

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 02:54 PM

I think the current ration of female vs. male plastic surgery is something like 80%-20%. Its rising for men, but not that much. As for the lips thing, its is really getting out of hand, I think. And actresses who dont have the requisite sofalips blow their own up to troutlike proportions, like Meg Ryan and Melanie Griffiths.
At her recent UC Berkeley lecture (link available in the Anything Goes thread), Joan Acocella responded to a question about dancers and weight by saying, in effect, Thin is better for dancing. Sorry. And she's right -- thin is better and that's absolutely true as far as it goes, but. Sure, its better to be thin but after stipulating that, the issue gets much dicier.

#35 Old Fashioned

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Posted 02 March 2005 - 03:44 PM

Thinner is better, but I find it absurd when a dancer like Suzanne Farrell had to be told to lose weight (so what if she had some baby fat in her cheeks?). As long as one's weight does not hinder the ability to execute steps correctly and at a proper speed, I don't think it should be as large of an issue as it is. The problem is we've trained our eyes to become accustomed to the "ideal" form and we pick out the dancers who don't mold to it.


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