Jump to content


CASSE NOISETTE pas de deux momentSugar Plum and Prince Koklush


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 rg

rg

    Emeralds Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,395 posts

Posted 08 January 2005 - 08:15 AM

the caption says: SUGARPLUM FAIRY - V. A. NIKITINA AND PRINCE KOKLUSH - P. A. GERDT
i suspect this reproduction, published in a russian book comes originally from one of the YEARBOOK OF THE IMPERIAL THEATERS, mostly likely 1892/93.

Attached Files



#2 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 08 January 2005 - 09:26 AM

Interesting! The picture I recall seeing had this reversed, but then either it or this version, which is sort of mixed-media, photography and photogravure, may have been "flipped". It happens all the time with old pictures made with glass-plate negatives. It may even be a collotype judging from the pebbly background. (A third change of medium.)

#3 Anthony_NYC

Anthony_NYC

    Bronze Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 290 posts

Posted 08 January 2005 - 10:34 AM

Wiley says the dancers move from audience left to audience right, though whether he gets this information from the choreographic notation or deduces it from the picture is unclear.

#4 Mme. Hermine

Mme. Hermine

    Emeralds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,636 posts

Posted 08 January 2005 - 10:47 AM

Good ol' Prince Whooping Cough! :)

#5 doug

doug

    Bronze Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 322 posts

Posted 08 January 2005 - 11:28 AM

I *assume* Wiley got the direction from the notation. I've not looked at the these particular notations too closely, but the Nutcracker notation as a whole (mostly in Nikolai Sergeev's hand ... and he appears to have to be in a hurry) contains at least ground plans for most of the formal dances, and arrows are often used to indicate traveling direction.

#6 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 08 January 2005 - 11:46 AM

Good ol' Prince Whooping Cough!    :)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Balanchine said that he thought that the Cavalier's name might have indicated that he was supposed to be a cough drop. (You know, MANLY candy, candy with a job, in the Victorian sensibility.)

#7 rg

rg

    Emeralds Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,395 posts

Posted 08 January 2005 - 11:57 AM

re: direction of the photo and likely the choreographic path, i think i too have seen this pic reproduced 'flopped' - i must dig out other possible sources, at least two or three it would seem. i chose this one b/c it was near at hand and reproduced in a good size, as i recall the other uses as illustration reproduce the pic smaller than this one in my russian book.
re: koklush = whooping cough, arlene croce added a 1977 footnote to her 1974 NEW YORKER rev. of balanchine's NUTCRACKER, it goes as follows:
"Several readers wrote, identifying 'Koklush' as a Russian gallicism derived from 'coqueluche,' whooping cough, but suggesting that the NUTCRACKER Cavalier was namee after 'coqueluche,' originally 'a hooded bonnet of the Middle Ages worn by men and women of fashion' and hence a term for favorite, fashion, or rage, as in 'coqueluche de ville' (town dandy) or 'coqueluche des dames' (ladies man). No one has explained why the same word means whooping cough."
i still like mel's suggestion that there might be a link here to smith brothers cough drops - a manly mint, which was introduced to russia around this time.
[have just checked two more sources: both my editions of Roslavleva's ERA OF RUSSIAN BALLET, and of John Warrack's TCHAIKOVSKY, reproduce the illustration in the same disposition as that scanned and posted from my russian book on SCHELKUNCHIK.]

#8 carbro

carbro

    Late Board Registrar

  • Rest in Peace
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,361 posts

Posted 08 January 2005 - 01:56 PM

Why does the photo (which I believe I have also seen reversed) suggest the table cloth trick? :wink:

#9 Paul Parish

Paul Parish

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,922 posts

Posted 08 January 2005 - 06:18 PM

All I can say is, if she went across the stage in that sous-sus, I'm IMPRESSED......

#10 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 08 January 2005 - 06:52 PM

Don't ya love these candid shots? :wink:

#11 Balanchinomane

Balanchinomane

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 149 posts

Posted 09 January 2005 - 07:58 AM

I recall a Royal Ballet Production about 20 years ago -
Anthony Dowell pulled Leslie Collier along on a piece
of cloth --- it was stage left to right --- and I think this
was the version Peter Wright did using archival material.
It's not in the recent production video 2000. Maybe
Leslie took her magic carpet with her when she retired.

#12 rg

rg

    Emeralds Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,395 posts

Posted 09 January 2005 - 08:02 AM

the 'magic carpet' effect is documented in the dowell/collier-led p. wright NUTCRACKER still on video, recently out in the US on kultur dvd.

#13 Mme. Hermine

Mme. Hermine

    Emeralds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,636 posts

Posted 10 January 2005 - 05:39 AM

The following quotation (not ballet related but pertinent) appeared in an interview on msnbc.com today:

"...He was the handsomest though admittedly not the brightest boy around, the coqueluche (the darling) of all the girls. "

#14 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 10 January 2005 - 01:52 PM

That's an extended metaphor: He's infectious, he's contagious, he gets around.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):