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Anti-War Ballets


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#1 perky

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 04:11 PM

I was reading the Autumn 2003 issue of DanceView and in an article on the Metropolitan Opera Ballet it was mentioned that Anthony Tudor had made an anti-war ballet called Echoing of Trumpets. It got me wondering how many other ballets have been created that took an anti-war stance.

The only other one I can think of at the moment is Ashton's Dante Sonata. I know there must be more. Any others? Any favorites?

#2 Leigh Witchel

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 04:54 PM

Kurt Jooss' The Green Table is a classic anti-war dance. It is not technically a ballet (Jooss did modern dance in Germany in the late 20s - early 30s, he was not classically trained) but it was a staple of the Joffrey for many years.

#3 Mel Johnson

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 05:30 PM

And still is. Tudor also did "Dark Elegies", another anti-war ballet set to Mahler's "Kindertotenleider".

#4 socalgal

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 06:31 PM

Was not Arpino's "Clowns" ballet (Joffrey Ballet 1968) an anti-war statement?

#5 Mel Johnson

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 06:40 PM

Yes, and "Clowns" still exists. I think it was more of an encompassing idea than simply anti-war, but anti-violence.

#6 Mashinka

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Posted 29 June 2004 - 01:22 AM

MacMillan's "Gloria" with music by Poulenc.

#7 Mel Johnson

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Posted 29 June 2004 - 03:38 AM

And in a larger sense, some of the comic ballets of the Romantic period were anti-war, like La Vivandière. Going to "the war" was the only way a lot of people had seen places outside of home, and the memories of many were filtered through rose-colored glass. Images of combat in these ballets is non-existent, but the love stories and funny incidents are what made the art.


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