Jump to content


The Lilac Fairy


  • Please log in to reply
36 replies to this topic

#31 leonid

leonid

    Platinum Circle

  • Foreign Correspondent
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,382 posts

Posted 11 November 2009 - 11:39 AM

I think the Paris Opera production has some nice costumes, some of the sets have a grandeur but with vulgar kitsch touches and for me the Paris Opera style has (Yvette Chauvire excepted) always shown too much semaphoring of the physicality of the steps they are executing and in general, the epaulement of the last two generations of dancers is a generally a killer.

Rudol Nureyev has to take some blame. but the significant legacy of Sylvie Guillem in the performance of academic classical ballet in Paris and across the world. has left a most negative impact and influence.

Chac un a son gout.

#32 Nanarina

Nanarina

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 544 posts

Posted 11 November 2009 - 01:38 PM

I think the Paris Opera production has some nice costumes, some of the sets have a grandeur but with vulgar kitsch touches and for me the Paris Opera style has (Yvette Chauvire excepted) always shown too much semaphoring of the physicality of the steps they are executing and in general, the epaulement of the last two generations of dancers is a generally a killer.

Rudol Nureyev has to take some blame. but the significant legacy of Sylvie Guillem in the performance of academic classical ballet in Paris and across the world. has left a most negative impact and influence.

Chac un a son gout.





Yes, but the Paris Opera is not the only company guilty of this, it seems to be a modern requirement, which actually effected the Bolshoi and Kirov, their lifts and general technique amazed the West when it was first seen here. The higher the leg extends the better, as far as some people are concerned, making a modest arabasque or movement look insignifigant to the eye, which nowadays looks restricted. Sylvie Guillem's amazing technique, won her grteat aclaim and brought ballet into the realm of athletiscim, which had only been seen in visiting companies mainly from Russia.

Now we have got used to this style of dance, it is hard to return to the older rechnique as it is not as exciting or spectacular. As long as it is not over the top, and retains the elements of musicality, lyricalism and careful performance, which is appriopriate to the role being danced, it is acceptable.

#33 MakarovaFan

MakarovaFan

    Bronze Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 459 posts

Posted 11 November 2009 - 04:51 PM

I think the Paris Opera production has some nice costumes, some of the sets have a grandeur but with vulgar kitsch touches and for me the Paris Opera style has (Yvette Chauvire excepted) always shown too much semaphoring of the physicality of the steps they are executing and in general, the epaulement of the last two generations of dancers is a generally a killer.

Rudol Nureyev has to take some blame. but the significant legacy of Sylvie Guillem in the performance of academic classical ballet in Paris and across the world. has left a most negative impact and influence.

Chac un a son gout.



Here, here, Leonid, regarding Guillem's negative impact and influence. I genuinely can't stand her dancing.

#34 Nanarina

Nanarina

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 544 posts

Posted 12 November 2009 - 03:59 AM

I think the Paris Opera production has some nice costumes, some of the sets have a grandeur but with vulgar kitsch touches and for me the Paris Opera style has (Yvette Chauvire excepted) always shown too much semaphoring of the physicality of the steps they are executing and in general, the epaulement of the last two generations of dancers is a generally a killer.

Rudol Nureyev has to take some blame. but the significant legacy of Sylvie Guillem in the performance of academic classical ballet in Paris and across the world. has left a most negative impact and influence.

Chac un a son gout.



Here, here, Leonid, regarding Guillem's negative impact and influence. I genuinely can't stand her dancing.




I agree with what you both say about Guillem's style and technique, she woulld not be my favourite dancer, I also find her attitude (personal rather than the balletic one ) is not very endearing, professionally known as Madamoiselle Non!!! Again it is a case of technique over shadowing other essential qualities. But I do not feel negative over other Paris Opera dancers. Some I like, some I do not. It is the total image they project which gains my appreciation/admiration..No Guillam is not even on my list of favourites.

#35 Nanarina

Nanarina

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 544 posts

Posted 12 November 2009 - 12:58 PM

Memorable Lilacs? Lyubov Kunakova (definitely!). Yulia Makhalina was also interesting to look at. Her lines are absolutely gorgeous when she dances after Aurora pricks herself... However, I don't think she is as "warm" as Kunakova (at least in that particular performance -- video with Lezhnina).

Also, in the scene where Aurora appears and dances a little with the Prince (for the 1st time) these two ballerinas do it a little differently. For example, when Aurora seems to escape from the Prince, and runs behind the corps de ballet, Kunakova seems to help the Prince capture her, whereas Makhalina almost tries to prevent him from capturing Aurora... I just thought it was an interesting observation.




Yes, Kunakova was lovely, and she stood out to me. She did have a warm stage personality and you were drawn to look at her. I am pretty sure I saw her dance live.

#36 jsmu

jsmu

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 166 posts

Posted 12 November 2009 - 06:05 PM

Although the production was in no way worthy of her, Nichols was
a wonderful Lilac--regal, with grandeur and delicacy and
tremendous attention to detail, including gesture. I imagine
Lallone would be good in this role as well. Lucky viewers who
got to see Adams (!) and Bergsma, by all accounts one of the
most wonderful dancers ever at RB, in this role. Bergsma talks--
in the interview in Striking a Balance-- about the role, the solo,
and how nervous it made her, especially when she was first cast
in the New York run. She seems similar to Adams in more than one
way: self-effacing, modest, characterizing herself as a 'nervous'
dancer, and not quite convinced of her own overwhelming virtue.

#37 esperanto

esperanto

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 66 posts

Posted 15 January 2012 - 11:37 PM

My favorite Lilac Fairy of all time is Deanne Bergsma. I saw her when she apppeared in the role for the first time in NY on opening night. Forget which year. She simply amazed everyone.

What do you think of having Lilac as a non-dancing role? I much prefer her to be one of the fairies.
I believe I saw one productin (was it the new Bolshoi version?) where she appeared as a dancing role and then later on she came in in a full dress, non-dancing.
what do "you all" think ?
Esperanto


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):