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The Lilac Fairy


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#16 Guest_KitriSpanishDancer_*

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Posted 07 June 2004 - 02:25 PM

wow that is very interesting

#17 mohnurka

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 08:28 AM

Memorable Lilacs? Lyubov Kunakova (definitely!). Yulia Makhalina was also interesting to look at. Her lines are absolutely gorgeous when she dances after Aurora pricks herself... However, I don't think she is as "warm" as Kunakova (at least in that particular performance -- video with Lezhnina).

Also, in the scene where Aurora appears and dances a little with the Prince (for the 1st time) these two ballerinas do it a little differently. For example, when Aurora seems to escape from the Prince, and runs behind the corps de ballet, Kunakova seems to help the Prince capture her, whereas Makhalina almost tries to prevent him from capturing Aurora... I just thought it was an interesting observation.

Edited by mohnurka, 27 June 2004 - 08:35 AM.


#18 esperanto

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 09:39 AM

My favorite Lilac Fairy was Deanne Bergsma in Royal Ballet. The first time she appeared in NY she brought the house down. Every one commented on how she seemed to just unfold and unfold in her opening variation. And all commented on how tall she was.

#19 Andrei

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 07:46 PM

It's strange that nobody mentioned Alla Osipenko. For me she is the one and only.

#20 mussel

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 10:12 AM

I don't want start a new thread, so I post my Lilac-related question here.

If Lilac's gift to Aurora was to neutralize Carabosse's curse, what was the gift that Lilac was about to grant when she was interrupted by Carabosse?

#21 Hans

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 10:49 AM

I believe it is wisdom, as the lilac represents wisdom in Russian folklore.

#22 Mel Johnson

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 10:50 AM

It is never stated, either in the ballet's libretto, or the original Perrault tale, but it must have had something to do with wisdom. A tradition of Russian baby- and childhood is to be given a birthday party where the baby or child is lain or seated under a lilac bush. In Russian tradition, the lilac is a symbol for wisdom.

#23 leonid17

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 11:12 AM

It's strange that nobody mentioned Alla Osipenko. For me she is the one and only.


Dear Andrei I agree that Alla Osipenko was an extraordinary Lilac Fairy at a time when the Kirov Ballet was at its most classical and I treasure that memory alongside Irina Kolpakova and Vladilen Semyenov
as the perfect classicists as Aurora and Prince Florimund.

Alla Osipenko was beautiful physically and facially conveying an elevated power that exuded a powerful mystery upon an impressionable teenager.

I also agree with esperanto that Deanne Bergsma was an extraordinary Lilac Fairy who was a good fairy incarnate. Her grandeur of movement and the warmth of her expression reflected a spiritual quality not matched since in my experience except by Lyubov Kunakova whom mohnurka referred to.

KitriSpanishDancer says, "I personally dislike the whole Lilac Fairy Variation, actually i really don't like sleeping beauty at all. Some of the variations are pretty but there are too many codas, to many variations, and it doesn't tickle my fancy. If i had to pick the leader fairy i wouldn't pick lilac, there are so many other fairies( finger,crystal, woodland glade, canary ....and that other one) the composer could of chosen... it upsets me. :angry:"

Connoisseurs of Academic Classical Ballet have over generations referred to "The Sleeping Beauty" as the apogee of the genre. A statement to which I can add nothing except to concur.

#24 Mashinka

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 02:26 AM

I also agree with esperanto that Deanne Bergsma was an extraordinary Lilac Fairy who was a good fairy incarnate. Her grandeur of movement and the warmth of her expression reflected a spiritual quality not matched since in my experience except by Lyubov Kunakova whom mohnurka referred to.


Hear, hear! :)

Sadly I never saw Osipenko in the role, but there is one more name that should be mentioned: Nina Speranskaya.

#25 richard53dog

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 06:09 AM

I also agree with esperanto that Deanne Bergsma was an extraordinary Lilac Fairy who was a good fairy incarnate. Her grandeur of movement and the warmth of her expression reflected a spiritual quality not matched since in my experience except by Lyubov Kunakova whom mohnurka referred to.


Hear, hear! :)




Bergsma was my first Lilac Fairy and she seemed just majestic to me. I was slightly familiar with Sleeping Beauty from the usual childhood fairy tales but also from a 45PRM record telling the story. This used excerpts from the Tchaikovsky score so when I first saw the full length ballet, I already knew the major "themes". My favorite was the one associated with the Lilac Fairy and when Bergsma came on stage, it was just a perfect match!

#26 rg

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 10:11 AM

when i first met Arlene Croce she noted more than once that the Kirov's production of SLEEPING BEAUTY (the K. Sergeyev one toured here in the early 1960s) left a memorable impression due partly to the authority and beauty of Inna Zubkovskaya's Lilac Fairy (feya Sireni).
i never saw her perform myself.
i have a number of photos of Zubkovskaya (nee Izraeleva) but i don't know that i have one of her Lilac.

#27 Drew

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 11:10 AM

Bergsma was also my first Lilac Fairy--Unfortunately, I only have very dim memories of the performance itself but I have extremely vivid memories of how wonderful she seemed to me. I don't think any Lilac Fairy I have seen since Bergsma has made the same kind of impression.

#28 Nanarina

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 03:48 PM

:) This may surprise everyone, but I actually prefer the Nureyev Paris Opera version, where both fairies are not danced in a tutu, they present an image of a much more superior being, They are dressed in lovely court costumes, equivilant to the King and Queen, In fact the roles are mimed. they are very gracious in the case of the Lilac Fairy, who wears a beautiful lilac coloured dress, in the period style. There is a much longer variation for the Prince in the vision scene, and when the Lilac Fairy comes to him she plays a major role, and clearly takes up the stage. When Princess Aurora arrives into the vision, she is drawn to the Fairy, and does her biding. After the scene, the Prince and Lilac Fairy travel in a boat, and then alight in front of the palace, where the evil Carabosse is spinning cobwebs, with her attendants who were the knitting girls. The Lilac Fairy exciiles the evil one, who collapses to be carried off to her doom. The latter character is played by a woman, not a Man, and is still fairly beautiful, but a mis guided and evil person. wearing a lovely costume with dark blue satin and sparkling jewels. The whole Paris Opera production is excellent, the costumes are exquisit, it is lwell lit and the scenery is very true to life, representing a wonderful palace,ballroom, and a woodland glade.
On the DVD the cast are{Aurelie Dupont (Aurora) Manual Legris, (Prince) Beatrice Martel(Lilac Fairy)
Nathalie Aubin(Carabosse).The fairies are Ruby, Emerald ans Saphire.Lead Fairy Diamond and her Cavalier.

#29 duffster

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 07:09 PM

I agree with Nanarina, having recently seen this DVD, I enjoyed this production as well. The Lilac Fairy, is a central role, and I thought that the mime was especially clear and not lost,as it sometimes can be. I don't remember any male variation being as long as the one in the vision scene here in Nureyev's version! Magnificently danced by Manuel Legris. Rudi certainly loved his rondes des jambes!

#30 Nanarina

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 08:10 AM

:P Yes... Ruddi and his passion foir R.D.J's. he was a real devil about them, I can remember him adding them to his Solo's, even when they were not part of the original choreography. He seemed to be really hung up on them. I think the extra long Prince's solo he put in the vision scene of Sleeping Beauty, is really effective, you have to be very patient, as it seems to go on and on. The stamina the Male lead needs to portray this must be huge, you can see Manuel Legris using his breathing control to be able to continue to the end. But he makes it so effortless. The portrayal and steps that are used by the Prince in this version, takes the role out of the usual supportive cavalier status, to a man with feeling and expression, looking for his special love to fill his loneliness. The Lilac Fairy comes to his rescue by showing him Aurora, when she asks hum "why are you crying"? he tells her "it is because he has not found love". The DVD is well worth buying to enjoy the performance and production. It really excells over the Royal Ballet version from an aesthetic point of view.


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