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Doug Varone


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#1 Alexandra

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 02:31 PM

Did anyone see this? Apparently it was the surprise hit of the week -- Allegra Kent was spotted in the audience, and I've been getting calls and emails the past few days saying how interesting it was.

DanceView Times has two reviews:

Nancy Dalva:

Russian Romance

Doug Varone's two programs at the Joyce Theatre last week were exhilarating because he has accomplished a synthesis of his dance origins (José Limón and Lar Lubovitch) and the contemporary vernacular (postmodernism) he has long favored. (He founded his own company in 1986). His new work called Castles plays on all current strengths, which include great duet-making, a knack for the small telling gesture, the parlaying of the interpenetration of forms sinto metaphor, and an ecomical allusiveness typical of short story writers.


and Clare Croft, in the second half of her A Weekend in New York

Doug Varone, with his gesture based style, also draws from the everyday, but creates a much “dancier” effect than the Jones/Zane company. Varone’s 2002 The Bottomland, a celebration of Kentucky’s Mammoth Cave National Park, has one of the best integrations of video and dance that I have seen. The video footage, all filmed in the Park, filled the stage’s back wall. Varone conceived and directed the video, with photography direction by Rob Draper and Vincent Gancie and production by Blue Land Media. The video introduced the dancers, then became both a backdrop for the onstage dancing and a character within the choreography. The video was most powerful in “Someone I Used to Know,” a duet for Natalie Desch and Larry Hahn. Onstage, the two jerked through a duet of a disintegrating couple, grabbing at each other, long past the possibility of a reconciling embrace. On the video screen, the couple of the past waltzed with giant smiles and gentle eyes.


Did anyone here go? Or seen Varone's work recently? The sense I've gotten is that he's made a breakthrough, and the recent work is far stronger than his earlier pieces.

#2 Funny Face

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Posted 10 February 2004 - 10:34 AM

This sounds very interesting. His company was in residence last spring at our dance program for about 6 weeks and set a work on our students. They also gave very good classes (compared to some of the modern classes I've been 'subjected' to). Intelligent movement presented well.

#3 vagansmom

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Posted 17 February 2004 - 07:58 PM

Where is his home base?

#4 Alexandra

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Posted 17 February 2004 - 08:04 PM

New York -- here's his web site

Doug Varone


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