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Oscar nominations announced


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#46 Helene

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Posted 17 February 2004 - 10:47 AM

What I found remarkable about Linney's performance in Mystic River is that at the end of the movie, when she puts her cards on the table, I realized that this wasn't a "big scene," but just a verbalization of the essence of a character that had been established throughout the movie, quietly as dirac and GWTW describe.

I was also impressed with both Bacon and Robbins in their roles. I think that Dave's role would be the hardest of the three men to play, because he is such a broken person, yet has to be riding the fine line between guilt and innocence and sympathy and contempt. What I liked about Hayden's performance was that she was believable as his train wreck counterpart. It was so uncomfortable when both of these nervous, unhappy people were in the same room. Couples like that are scary to be around.

#47 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2004 - 11:34 AM

hockeyfan228, it's interesting that some people were taken aback by Linney's big speech -- it seemed to come out of nowhere for them. But if you're watching Linney closely, you can see how she lays the groundwork, as you say.

I may as well come out and say it -- I wasn't that impressed with Tim Robbins. I thought he was a little too much, although it was not his fault -- it's how that character is written. My vote would be for Alec Baldwin.

#48 dirac

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Posted 20 February 2004 - 05:14 PM

The producer of this year's show says there will be no time limit on acceptance speeches this year. More time for the stars to open mouth, insert foot. Goody!


http://www.nbc4.tv/e...742/detail.html

#49 carbro

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Posted 20 February 2004 - 08:51 PM

[Producer Joe] Roth added, "How am I going to say (no) to Clint Eastwood? Or Sean Penn? Not only are they adults, but they are the best in their field. So really, all you can ask them to do is to try to give some sense of how special it is."


Sure. But what about the less articulate :yawn: , less beautiful :yawn: behind-the-scenes people, whose egos :yawn: are likely almost as big as the actors and directors? :sleeping: This is one for the VCR, with thumb resting near the fast forward button. One question: think I'll need a 10-hour tape? :wink:

#50 Helene

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Posted 20 February 2004 - 09:01 PM

In their defense, the behind-the-scenes people usually thank a whole bunch of people who work really crazy hours on the movies, and while it's tedious for us, it's their only chance to recognized their workers/collaborators (and give their families something to kvell about). At least they usually don't try to sound profound :wink:

#51 vagansmom

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Posted 22 February 2004 - 03:01 PM

I almost prefer to watch that "less..." group of people Carbro mentions receiving their awards than the actual known entities. I have every bit as much, if not more, respect for their craft than I do for that of the "beautiful people". It might be hard to watch those folks because we've never seen many of them before but in a way, that's what I find them so intriguing.

#52 carbro

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Posted 22 February 2004 - 05:28 PM

Oh, I fear perhaps I am being misunderstood. I value the work done by the costumers and lighting people, the sound editors, etc., without whom there would be no product. The bottom line is, this is an entertainment show above all else (at least that's how I experience it from the vantage point of my sofa), and while the great achievements of the year deserve recognition, the winners tend to lack charisma, and the audience deserves a well-paced show.

I hope that the tradespeople further down -- the ones who toil for endless hours -- receive their thanks privately throughout production process. Do only those whose bosses get the award deserve recognition on tv, to the exclusion of others?

I remember the days before the time limits . . . :rolleyes:

#53 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2004 - 02:52 PM

Yes, there were those shows that seemed to last as long as World War II, and left you just as shellshocked. I also enjoy seeing the editors and the sound guys get their moment in the sun, but there is definitely a limit.

One thing I do miss about those older shows is the flagrant bad taste of the evening gowns. With a few exceptions, you rarely see a lady with that Cher/Geena Davis damn-the-torpedoes flair these days. Everyone tries to be conservative and tasteful, more or less, making me long for the days when the fashions were not internationalized and Nolan Miller and Bob Mackie dominated the scene.

#54 perky

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Posted 23 February 2004 - 04:26 PM

Ah, you just mentioned two ladies I always enjoyed watching for at the Oscars. My favorite Cher dress was that black beaded see through Aztec look with the towering headress she wore the year she wasn't nominated for Mask. And my favorite Geena Davis is the white ostrich plummy looking creation she wore one year.
Two very smart, savvy women who knew what to wear to assure that their picture would be plastered over the papers and shown endlessly over the airwaves the next day, as opposed to someone who just has bad taste.

#55 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2004 - 04:28 PM

Let's call it good bad taste. :)


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