Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

The Classical PeriodEras in Ballet, continued


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#16 Cliff

Cliff

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts

Posted 30 August 2003 - 08:43 PM

I went to decent public schools where the art and music classes concentrated on practice, not theory or history. I learned that I lack any musical ability and cannot paint. It was only after discovering ballet that I began listening to classical music.

Sorry for shifting the subject. Why is it, that while much of classical music came from German and Austrian composers, there are few German and Austrian ballets?

Cliff

#17 Alexandra

Alexandra

    Board Founder

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,275 posts

Posted 30 August 2003 - 09:09 PM

What a terrific question! My off the top of the head answer is that I think much of it is due to the institutional structure of ballet. First, all over Europe, ballet scores were usually created by house composers -- composers attached to the opera house. There are exceptions, of course (Mozart wrote a ballet, as did Beethoven) but generally you had people who specialized in ballet music and generally they weren't the top composers. Why top composers were drawn to opera and not ballet is a question I can't answer. Second, Vienna does have a continuous ballet tradition and had some good choreographers, but the ballets haven't lasted, for the same reasons they haven't lasted elsewhere -- generational change, no notation, no easy way to keep ballets alive from one choreographer/dancer generation to another.

#18 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 31 August 2003 - 02:31 AM

Gesundheit!

Ist besser als krankheit.

Actually, the Mecca of the musical world for much of the past 300 years has been Leipzig. It was known for excellence in music before J.S. Bach moved there in 1723. Stimulated, and some say protected, by the presence of the University, Liepzig Conservatory did for music what the University, founded in 1409, did for Theology, Law and Medicine.

#19 Ari

Ari

    Gold Circle

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 887 posts

Posted 01 September 2003 - 05:01 PM

Why is it, that while much of classical music came from German and Austrian composers, there are few German and Austrian ballets?

One thought that comes to mind is that German music tends to be heavy, and the best ballet music is light -- not light as in "frivolous" but as in "getting off the ground." The dance music I can think of in German works tends to be folk-based: a weighty kind of dancing. Of course, if there had been choreographers of real talent working in Germany and Austria at the time of the great composers, this might have been different.

#20 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 01 September 2003 - 05:07 PM

Just imagine if Frederick the Great had been a dancer like Louis XIV and not the flutist that he was. :wink:

#21 Alexandra

Alexandra

    Board Founder

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,275 posts

Posted 01 September 2003 - 05:31 PM

I think Ari has made a good point -- German music isn't musique dansant. (generally, generally)

Re Frederick the Great, he did have a ballet company -- La Barbarina (I forget her real name) was his ballerina and he was quite taken with her. He wanted a world class ballerina -- so he wanted to compete with his fellow Greats, as it were. Perhaps that strain of ballet didn't develop because there was no Academy? (But first, a school. Louis and Mr. B.)

#22 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 01 September 2003 - 05:36 PM

Exactly my idea!

I can hear us now:

Achtung, jetzt tun wir Kreis des Beines aus den Grund!



#23 Hans

Hans

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,104 posts

Posted 01 September 2003 - 05:37 PM

Don't forget Catherine the Great! :wink:

#24 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 01 September 2003 - 06:23 PM

Q: What're purple and partition Poland?

A: Frederick the Grape and Catherine the Grape!

:offtopic:

Sorry.

#25 Hans

Hans

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,104 posts

Posted 04 September 2003 - 11:25 AM

I had my first music history class today, and we are studying the Baroque and "Classic" periods. My professor (he says other music historians do this too) uses "classic" so that people won't be confused as so often happens with Classical/classical--they could mean either "classical music" in general, the Classical period, or refer to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Interestingly, I know someone mentioned that ballet borrows the terms of its period from other arts such as music, but my professor today said that music borrows them from literature and painting! Goodness knows what the English and art professors would say... :ermm:

#26 Alexandra

Alexandra

    Board Founder

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,275 posts

Posted 04 September 2003 - 02:20 PM

Hans, if that comment about music was mine, I meant it literally: "other arts such as music," (i.e., the other arts one of which is music) not giving music any primacy in the name game.

#27 Hans

Hans

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,104 posts

Posted 05 September 2003 - 09:12 AM

I see. Thank you for clarifying :).


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):