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Timeless AudreyExhibit for Audrey Hepburn


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#1 Funny Face

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 03:33 PM

What an amazing tribute to my muse -- Audrey Hepburn. The exhibit was shown in my city from May 16-July 20, and if it comes anywhere near you, go!!! The exhibit, called "Timeless Audrey," is divided into 5 parts: Audrey, as wife and mother; Audrey's Home & Garden; Audrey, the Star; Audrey, the Muse; and Audrey and the Children of the World. Everyone will find something that particularly appeals to them in this exhibit.

Some of her costumes, along with her wedding dresses and the outfit she wore for one of the christenings in the family, are on display. And they are not encased in glass or otherwise. It's just you standing an inch away from these treasures -- and you're on the honor system to not actually touch them. And you don't -- because they seem downright sacred. And tiny! You cannot imagine what a sprite Audrey was until you see these clothes up close. The tiniest bodices and tiniest armholes. They're all quite delicate too -- and beautifully tailored.

One part of the exhibit pertains to Audrey, the Star, with one of its features being a series of slides flashing images of Audrey dancing in "Funny Face," a picture that has everything I could hope for: Audrey, Astaire, fashion, books, philosophy, Paris, music and dance. Every shot of Audrey doing her 'impromptu' jazz dance in the Parisian beatnik club is incredible. Pure exuberance and joy. It must have been a dream come true for her -- except for the temporary row she had with choreographer Stanley Donen. Audrey was costumed in a black turtleneck, slim black pants, and black loafers. And, she was performing in a dark, smoky club. The choreographer opted to put white socks on her, believing that her movement would otherwise be totally lost in the scene. Audrey cried about this, believing that the white socks would interfere with her line. But after she saw the final product, she graciously sent a note to the choreographer, reading "You were right."

The most difficult part of the exhibit to view is the final segment -- her work with UNICEF. It's difficult in part because you realize that Audrey, holding these dying babies, is dying herself. It's also difficult because Audrey states on screen that these babies are literally dying in front of her. Up until that point, you see them as malnourished and suffering, but to have it put in the bluntest of terms, that they are literally dying in front of you, is incredibly sad. She is almost afraid to hold the babies for fear that they will break a limb in the process. One last thing that was quite moving is how Audrey walked among all the starving and suffering adults, taking their hands in hers and bending down to kiss their hands.

Incidentally, proceeds from the exhibit -- which is to travel to the Far East, Europe and America -- go to Audrey Hepburn's Children's Fund.

Edited by Funny Face, 30 July 2003 - 03:36 PM.


#2 Alexandra

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 03:41 PM

Thanks for that, Funny Face, and welcome to Ballet Alert!

And of course, Audrey Hepburn was a ballet dancer briefly. I just saw "Funny Face" again a few months ago and the stunning part, to me, was the final fashion sequence in Paris -- including the run down the stairs in the red dress. The kind of performance only a dancer could give.

#3 Funny Face

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 07:19 PM

Oh yes! She descends this enormous staircase, wearing a red gown and carrying in her arms, raised high, a marching red fabric scarf/stole. She keeps descending, exclaiming to the photographer (Astaire), "Take the picture! Take the picture!"

Well, this makes me chuckle a bit, because it reminds me of a company rehearsal I had some years back when our troupe was learning the Chinese Ribbon Dance -- an extremely aerobic dance in which you must keep jumping lightly in the air while waving these enormous red flags on long poles and making a variety of designs with them. During one rehearsal, I suddenly had the urge to shout, in my best Audrey imitation, while moving my red flag about, "Take the picture! Take the picture!" My fellow dancers got quite a kick out of this, knowing what an Audrey fan I have always been.

I think her joy throughout that picture really shows -- it was wonderful compensation for the ballet career she was not destined to have, after coming to terms with the assessment she was given of her chances.

#4 Alexandra

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 07:29 PM

Yes. She wasn't much of a modern dancer, in the jazz routine she did earlier. But I think fashion models are the danseuses nobles of today -- it's all about display of the body, how to walk, etc., so she did get her chance!

#5 dirac

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 03:48 PM

 A new exhibition of Hepburn photos and magazine covers goes on display in London.

 

And now Audrey Hepburn is to be celebrated with a photography exhibition at London's National Portrait Gallery.

 

An exhibition about the actress's life and career will open in July and include family images of her at ballet practice and pictures taken during her early days working as a model in London.

 




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