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Season OpenerNureyev's Don Quixote


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#31 Thalictum

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Posted 20 October 2003 - 01:05 PM

Nureyev was addicted to rond de jambe. Why was this man allowed to choreograph, and re-choreograph classic texts? The Soviets emendations were as nothing to Nureyev's in the West.

#32 Juliet

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Posted 20 October 2003 - 02:50 PM

A good dancer is not necessarily a good choreographer. Nureyev had a great passion for the art and his own work was such that I would imagine he would not have found it difficult to work his way into a choreographic seat.

I don't particularly care for his choreography, but I will not go so far as to rank it against another's.....I certainly do not think he is remembered primarily for his choreography.

#33 dido

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Posted 30 October 2003 - 01:48 PM

Does any one have casting for this weekend? I'm going to try to go twice, because I'd like to see Jennifer Gelfland one last time, but I'd like to see Lorna Feijoo too, I've heard such good things about her here.
Any help much appreciated.

#34 nantastic

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Posted 30 October 2003 - 02:00 PM

Boston Ballet finally updated their website at http://www.bostonballet.org. Here's this weekend's casting info:

KITRI/ JENNIFER GELFAND (OCT 30, NOV 1e)
DULCINEA: LARISSA PONOMARENKO
(OCT 31e, NOV 2)
LORNA FEIJ”O (NOV 1m)


BASILIO: CHRISTOPHER BUDZYNSKI
(OCT 30, NOV 1e)
NELSON MADRIGAL (OCT 31, NOV 2)
YURY YANOWSKY (NOV 1m)

DON QUIXOTE: VIKTOR PLOTNIKOV (OCT 30, NOV 1)
ROBERT MOORE (OCT 31e, NOV 2)

#35 jbtlse

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Posted 02 November 2003 - 03:50 PM

Some observations from my spouse who was at every Don Q performance (finally he's been converted into a fan!):

Lorna Feijoo danced with her husband, Nelson Madrigal (sub for Yury Yanowsky who was sick), for the Sat matinee--apparently her performance was spectacular.

Laura Young ( the dancer Jennifer Gelfand replaced mid performance in Don Q oh so many years ago) was on stage as a super for Jennifer Gelfand's final performance Saturday night.
Ms. Gelfand was given a Juliet costume--said to be her favorite role.

#36 koshka

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Posted 06 November 2003 - 01:13 PM

Another thing that I am just remembering about my last trips to BB: there are soooooo many Russian speakers in the audience that I am just waiting for the first time a really good performance gets a Russian synchronized ovation.
Russian audiences clap in sync for good performances, with the speed ramping up for the most popular performers.

#37 Alexandra

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Posted 06 November 2003 - 01:15 PM

That's an interesting point! Russians are good for the arts, if I may be permitted an ethnic stereotype :D Look at all the great Russian musicians and dancers from the early part of the 20th century! There's a lot of hope that the New Russian Wave will wash over ballet and revive it. I didn't realize that there was a large Russian community in Boston as well. Thanks!

#38 koshka

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Posted 06 November 2003 - 01:29 PM

I know this is wandering off topic a bit, but ballet is just much more "mainstream" in Russia, and Russians who emigrate here seem to just continue that practice, though it's hard to know how it will be with the next generation.

In Moscow and St Peterburg, it seems that for educated people it is absolutely standard to be up on who the big names are even in the absence of any special interest in ballet. One of my friends _always_ knew who was in and who was out and always asked with great interest who I had seen dance, but never ever had any interest in actually attending a performance.

Kids are taken to children's theaters, then to matinees, then to evening performances. (Mariinsky tickets explicitly state that children under a certain age--11 I think--are not admitted to evening performances).

Anyway, there is much more "audience participation"--not just the synchronized ovations, but clapping expected at certain junctures where here the music simply continues.

#39 Alexandra

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Posted 06 November 2003 - 01:32 PM

I have several friends who were first generation Russian emigres in the 1930s or 40s and, as you wrote, going to the theater -- ballet, plays, concerts, whatever -- and museums was what everyone did on Sunday afternoon, whether the family was that of a bus driver or a physicist. May this tradition continue!

#40 Juliet

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Posted 06 November 2003 - 01:57 PM

But not the clapping, please.
Yes, after the Preghiera of Mozartiana, we had a round of applause....eventually everyone Got The Point.

I know that everyone will clap in time for Odile and her fouettes, and I have no objection whatever to synchronized clapping, but I personally find constant breaks for applause a little irritating. I know, I know......

I do like it when the audience has a clue, though.

#41 koshka

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Posted 07 November 2003 - 05:36 AM

but I personally find constant breaks for applause a little irritating

Ah, so true. And why does this bring to mind La Volochkova's performance in DC last spring?

All things in moderation...it is worth noting that a Kirov-in-Russia DonQ is a full hour longer than a Kirov-in-DC DonQ.

#42 dido

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Posted 08 November 2003 - 06:14 AM

I remember going with my sister (a professional musician) to see the 4 Seasons a few years ago, and she was horrified at the clapping, because so much of the transitional music gets lost. I was never one for clapping until the curtain came down anyway, but the more I go see Boston Ballet the more I feel myself becooming unhappy, instead of just puzzled.

I do understand wanting to show admiration and appreciation for a particularly beautiful pas of whatever kind, but it seems more and more distracting. BB has one of the most outstanding orchestras I've heard, and it seems a shame to drown them out every 15 minutes.

(And yes. Clapping during Mozartiana seems all, all wrong to me.)


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