Jump to content


Pas de Quatre


  • Please log in to reply
32 replies to this topic

#16 rg

rg

    Emeralds Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,446 posts

Posted 16 July 2003 - 12:07 PM

according to IED:
GRISI, CARLOTTA (Caronne Adele Jopsephine Marie Grisi: born 18 June 1819 in Visinada, Upper Istria,Italy, died 20 May 1899 in Saint-Jean, Geneve-Petit-Saconnex) Italian ballet dancer; Carlotta Grisi was a daughter of Vicenzo Grisi, an employee in the public surveyor's department, and Maria Grisi nee Boschetti.
[hope i didn't mistype anything, excluding that is the missing accents]

#17 Hans

Hans

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,104 posts

Posted 16 July 2003 - 12:13 PM

Come to think of it, McKerrow would make a good Grisi :unsure:.

I was using current dancers in order to be realistic, but if we're going to go into dream casts (aside from the original one, of course!), I think I would cast:

Beriosova as Taglioni
Sizova as Grisi
Maybe Ayupova as Grahn?
Can't think of an ideal Cerrito right now, but I'm sure it'll come to me.

Thank you, rg :ermm:.

#18 Victoria Leigh

Victoria Leigh

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 603 posts

Posted 16 July 2003 - 02:22 PM

Hans, how about Carla Fracci?

#19 glebb

glebb

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 807 posts

Posted 16 July 2003 - 03:40 PM

Did Grisi dance mostly in Italy or Paris?

I think Carla Fracci is charming as Cerrito in the cast I have on video. :innocent:

#20 Alexandra

Alexandra

    Board Founder

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,248 posts

Posted 16 July 2003 - 03:45 PM

I think of Cerrito as a merry sexpot!

#21 glebb

glebb

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 807 posts

Posted 16 July 2003 - 03:48 PM

Maybe like the young Kschessinska, before she became the Tsaritza of the dance. :innocent:

#22 Hans

Hans

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,104 posts

Posted 16 July 2003 - 06:35 PM

Fracci is an excellent suggestion, Ms. Leigh :innocent:.

#23 silvy

silvy

    Bronze Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 485 posts

Posted 17 July 2003 - 10:30 AM

Well, when I was coached on the Cerrito role, I was told to imagine I was "Miss Congeniality" :)

silvy

#24 glebb

glebb

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 807 posts

Posted 19 July 2003 - 10:56 AM

I've always thought that Taglioni might have had a gliding and floating quality as if she were wearing a crown. By the time of the Pas de Quatre performance she would have been older than the others and maybe had a gracious quality. I've read that her neck, arms and legs were very long.

Grahn must have been a jumper with a lyrical side. Maybe this is the quality that Alexandra has spoken of when describing excellent Bournonville dancers?

Cerrito must have been a flirtatious spitfire, executing steps with a lust for movement. Does everyone think she took that extra bow?

Grisi is hard for me to picture except standing in a front B+ holding her scepter of grapes - Act I Giselle. She must have been quite beautiful.

#25 Hans

Hans

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,104 posts

Posted 19 July 2003 - 11:06 AM

I've always thought that Taglioni might have had a gliding and floating quality as if she were wearing a crown.  By the time of the Pas de Quatre performance she would have been older than the others and maybe had a gracious quality.  I've read that her neck, arms and legs were very long.

Yes--that's the reason she always wore bracelets and a necklace onstage: so her limbs wouldn't appear quite so long.

I don't know about that extra bow, but considering that her variation was right before Taglioni's, it would have been extremely ill-mannered. Imagine Fonteyn instead of Taglioni and Lynn Seymour instead of Cerrito. It could have happened, but I think it's doubtful.

#26 glebb

glebb

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 807 posts

Posted 19 July 2003 - 11:12 AM

Interesting comparison.

Maybe there was a rivalry. What an excellent platform for a spitfire to get back at the queen. :dry:

#27 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 19 July 2003 - 11:47 AM

According to the Illustrated London News of the period, there was no moment which betrayed any jealousy among the four superstars. This is also the account which records the opening moments of the work as the curtain opening on a bare stage and the four ballerine entering from up left to take their opening tableau. I've seen it done this way, and with the right people, it works better than opening on a ground-fogged stage, or a blackout with a downspot on the tableau. Cerrito was certainly a great favorite in England, though. There's a wonderful period cartoon which makes use of the way most Britons pronounced her name. It shows a little girl doing a developpé a la seconde, and saying to her aged grandmother, "Look, Granny, Cer-i-to" To which the old lady replies, "I'll Sir-high-toe you, if you don't stop showing your pantaloons that way!"

#28 grace

grace

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 584 posts

Posted 21 July 2003 - 07:20 AM

According to the Illustrated London News of the period, there was no moment which betrayed any jealousy among the four superstars


- interesting! maybe not enough people who stage this ballet are aware of that...

#29 rg

rg

    Emeralds Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,446 posts

Posted 21 July 2003 - 07:54 AM

seems to me another example of the 'will you trust the ballet?' question balanchine reportedly posed to the folk wanting to film his works for television. too often it seems unlikely that ballet will be trusted for and of itself. 'directors' and/or various 'presenters' of ballet often can't help but intrude upon or add to what the work's so-called text might be.
i suspect that the campy/competitive accent - sometimes more pronounced, sometimes less - is a result of assuming the 'feelings' of the ballerina/originators of the dance. or perhaps it was encouraged by dolin in his pastiche.
maybe some who know from experience hearing what stagers say regarding dolin's wishes can elaborate.
from my limited seeing of this number performed - as i recall the kirov tended to refrain from all eye-rolling/haughty interactions among the four - the less 'editorializing' of competitive attitudes the better. however much these individuals might have felt competitive it's unlike to my way of seeing that any would have telescoped those feelings to an audience. wearing insecurity on a sleeve hardly seems something an accomplished and confident ballerina might do.
still, it's important to distinguish what details are/were apt to perrot's ballet and what to dolin's.

#30 Hans

Hans

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,104 posts

Posted 21 July 2003 - 11:24 AM

Yes rg, according to the tape I have, the only moment that might be construed as 'competitive' is when Taglioni bows just one more time to Cerrito before leaving the stage, but it's not exactly mean-spirited.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):