Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Pronunciation of Ballet Names


  • Please log in to reply
141 replies to this topic

#46 djb

djb

    Senior Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 128 posts

Posted 12 November 2003 - 06:39 PM

Alexandra, do you you have that link handy?

#47 Marianna

Marianna

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 54 posts

Posted 12 November 2003 - 06:40 PM

DJB - you are simply brilliant!! :lol: Second grande reverence comes to you :D :thumbsup: YOU'VE GOT THAT RAZOR SHARP LINGUIST'S SET OF MIND!


And most likely Alexandra IS right and there are some Balerinovs and Balerinovas living in Russia!! But there are definitely no Balerinovs in my family tree :shrug:

Another good example of moving a stress in a lastname to make it sound DISTINGUISHED - "divina ballerina" of Mariinsky young Diana VishnYOva's last name is/would be USUALLY pronounced with a stress falling on that "YO" vowel ("e" with two dots above it) - however, I keep hearing now and then - when the last name is mentioned in the ballet circles - the stress has moved to the very first syllable making the common last name sound distinguished - as VEE-shneva. Those distinguished noble people !! :wink:

I'll try to answer your question about "BARYSHNIK" (yes- yes, definitely, one is sitting on a family tree of that famous Mikhail :wink: ). "BARYSH" is actually a word of TURKIC origin which was "borrowed" by Russian language from Turkish during the extensive cultural/trade/war exchange between Russians and Turks back then (i would think, back in XVII-XVIII cc.). I do not know what this word means in Turkish but in Russian it means "PROFIT/INTEREST FROM A DEAL" (and I wouldn't even try to guess what it could mean in Turkish as - this is really amusing! - the Turkish word BARDAK means only a GLASS (a glass of water), but it is A BAD MESS in Russian; Turkic DURAK is only A STOP (like a BUS STOP) - but it means FOOL in Russian; there is a nice Turkish male name BARAN - it actually means MALE SHEEP in Russian and is often associated with really dumb people. Cool, eh? (my four summer vacations spent in Turkey scuba-diving didn't go wasted) :D

So, "HORSE DEALER" may be applicable in case when we're talking about someone making a profit - BARYSHNIK, that fits the description, no?

I will burst like a big bubble if I won't tell you this now (and shoot me if you have already known this!) - NUR-eyev comes from another Turkic word meaning - NUR<=>DIAMOND or LIGHT (and something divine on the top of it all). Isn't that something?

Au revoir for now (and I was planning this one to be a really 'short and sweet' one :blushing: :sleeping:

PS A propos, I could also tell you later where meanings of the last names of Ulanova, Vasilyev, Lopatkina come from - if you really care to know :)

#48 djb

djb

    Senior Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 128 posts

Posted 12 November 2003 - 06:53 PM

Thanks, Marianna -- I'm definitely interested in hearing all. I'll have to hurry and get up to 30 posts, or whatever it is.

#49 Alexandra

Alexandra

    Board Founder

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,258 posts

Posted 12 November 2003 - 06:53 PM

Love the Nureyev story -- I've read that there are hordes of Nureyevs in Ufa, but I still like the derivation. I'm sure people would be interested in others!

djb, I do have the link handy :)

Here's a master page about Italian names: (I have no Italian blood, just curious about 19th century ballet history!)

http://www.angelfire...italynames.html

For a direct link to finding where people live, try this one:

http://elenco.libero...rcaOmonimie.jsp

It is, I think, a phone directory (!!!) Put in a name and you'll get a map with little circles on it (indicating all the people named Blasi, say, if that's what you're searching for). Click on each region and you'll get the names, addresses and phone numbers, by province, city, suburb, whatever, of all the present day Blasis!

If you're interested in the derivation of names, try this. (It's in Italian, but I was surprised how much I could read of it, and you can always copy something into one of the translation sites)

http://www.melegnano...i/cognomi00.htm

That site must have taken so much work!!!!

#50 djb

djb

    Senior Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 128 posts

Posted 12 November 2003 - 07:11 PM

Grazie!

#51 canbelto

canbelto

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,901 posts

Posted 01 November 2004 - 06:54 PM

Ok, how do you pronounce Altynai Asylmuratova?
Is it "Asylmu-RA-tova" or "Asylmurato-VA" or "Asylmura-TO-va"? I know she's from Kazhakstan so the pronunciation might be different.
Also, is it Sylvie GUIL-lem or Sylvie Gui-LEM?

#52 vrsfanatic

vrsfanatic

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 673 posts

Posted 02 November 2004 - 03:27 AM

The way I heard it said in St. Petersburg, Russia, by Russians and in the US by Russians is "Asylmu-RA-tova". Now whether or not that is how it is said in other parts of the world, I do not know.

As for Guillem (Guilem), I would only report how I say it!

#53 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 02 November 2004 - 03:51 AM

Just make it one syllable, with a hard initial "g": GYEM.

#54 soubrette_fan

soubrette_fan

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 32 posts

Posted 04 February 2005 - 11:00 AM

Sofiane Sylve - is it "So-fee-ann" or "Suh-fy-anee"?

Also, for her last name, is it "Seeve" or more like "Silve"?

Wendy Whelan - "Way-lan", or "Well-lan"?

Ashley Bouder - "Boo-der" or "Bow -der"?

Maria Kowroski? Is it "Kuh-rawski" or "Kuh-roh-ski" or "Kuh-ROW-ski"?

Nikolaj Hubbe?

Suzanne Farrell- "Farr-ell" or "Fair-elle"?

Zenaida Yanowsky?

#55 Marga

Marga

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,022 posts

Posted 04 February 2005 - 11:45 AM

Wendy Whelan - "Way-lan", or "Well-lan"?

Suzanne Farrell-  "Farr-ell" or "Fair-elle"?


I'll give you the ones I know for sure:

Wendy Whelan = whale-in
Suzanne Farrell = rhymes with "barrel"

#56 carbro

carbro

    Late Board Registrar

  • Rest in Peace
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,361 posts

Posted 04 February 2005 - 12:04 PM

Sofiane Sylve - is it "So-fee-ann" or "Suh-fy-anee"? 
Also, for her last name, is it "Seeve" or more like "Silve"?
.    .    .
Ashley Bouder - "Boo-der" or "Bow -der"?
Maria Kowroski? Is it "Kuh-rawski" or "Kuh-roh-ski" or "Kuh-ROW-ski"?
Nikolaj Hubbe?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


so-fee-AHN SEEL-v' (not quite a second syllable)
Ashley BOW-der (rhymes with Louder)
Maria Ko-ROSS-ki
NI-ko-lye HOO-buh

#57 Ceeszi

Ceeszi

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 144 posts

Posted 04 March 2005 - 11:42 AM

How do you pronounce Diaghilev?

Is it Dee-a'-gi-lev or Dee-a'zhi-lev?

#58 jorgen

jorgen

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 149 posts

Posted 04 March 2005 - 01:27 PM

I would say Nikolaj Hübbe is:

Ni-ko-LYE HY-beh

#59 carbro

carbro

    Late Board Registrar

  • Rest in Peace
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,361 posts

Posted 04 March 2005 - 01:48 PM

Point well taken, Jorgen. As with many immigrants (although I realize that technically, NH is still a Danish citizen, not an immigrant), the pronunciation gets mangled by those of us on the west side of the Atlantic -- or east side of the Pacific. I posted the pronunciation New Yorkers have (mis)applied. :(

#60 Marga

Marga

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,022 posts

Posted 04 March 2005 - 01:54 PM

How do you pronounce Diaghilev?

Is it Dee-a'-gi-lev or Dee-a'zhi-lev?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The first one: Dee-a'-gi'lev


1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):