carbro

Rest in Peace
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About carbro

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    Late Board Registrar

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  • Connection to/interest in ballet** (Please describe. Examples: fan, teacher, dancer, writer, avid balletgoer)
    Avid ballet-goer, former recreational student
  • City**
    New York City
  • State (US only)**, Country (Outside US only)**
    New York
  1. Hi, sasark, and welcome to BalletAlert! Lucky you, to have been able to see Erica Cornejo regularly. She was a favorite of mine at ABT, and I miss her. As you'll see as you browse the forums, there is no specific "language of ballet criticism," so don't feel intimidated. We're eager to hear what you see. Do you remember the leads in the Prague Swan Lake? Curious.
  2. Welcome to BalletAlert, kika. You do not yet have 10 substantive posts, so you do not yet have access to personal messaging. Any potential seller can reach you through the CONTACT US link at the top, right-hand side of the screen. The admins will be happy to forward messages to you. However, it might be more timely if you're willing to provide an email address here. That risks spam, but it's up to you. PS: If you get in, I hope you report on it.
  3. Thank you, winnieido, and welcome to BalletAlert! Hyperdog, since winnieido doesn't yet have messaging privileges (and if you're still following this forum), please use the CONTACT US link near the top right-hand side of the screen, and we'll forward to her.
  4. FIIIIIII-nally! Thank you, kbarber.
  5. Welcome, amckean. Love the photo. So ethereal! I will look forward to reading your posts here. I hope you won't be shy about engaging in our discussions that may not be about a particular performance.
  6. And a warm welcome to you, too, kfalker.
  7. We are excited to have you, mnmom. I took a glimpse at http://balancing-pointe.com , and I expect to spend quite a few hours there. Congratulations to your daughter on her apprenticeship. And welcome to BalletAlert!
  8. Dale, are you talking about the "ring" seats numbered Row AA? Because I've never had a problem with the single-letter seats. Maybe the difference in our heights, though not great, accounts for our different reactions.
  9. From the publicist: In collaboration with the School of American Ballet The Beauty of Ballet Saturday, March 8, 2014 at 2pm At Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts at Brooklyn College Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts at Brooklyn College's 2013-14 season continues with The Beauty of Ballet, a free lecture demonstration presented by the School of American Ballet (SAB), on Saturday, March 8 at 2pm. This event is free, with no ticket or reservation required. The 45-minute, family-friendly presentation will illustrate how students develop into accomplished classical ballet dancers, alternating examples of advanced classroom training exercises with the performance of excerpts from notable ballets. School of American Ballet faculty member Katrina Killian (a former New York City Ballet soloist) and advanced students from SAB will be featured in the enchanting and informative introduction to the art of classical ballet. How do ballerinas dance on their toes? How do dancers spin and turn without getting dizzy? How do male dancers jump so high? Those questions and more will be answered during the demonstration, and favorite moments from ballets such as The Sleeping Beauty, The Nutcracker, and Swan Lake will be performed to live music. The Beauty of Ballet is recommended for ages 4 through adult. About the School of American Ballet The School of American Ballet, the official academy of the New York City Ballet, has been the leading academy for classical ballet training in the United States since it's founding in1934 by Lincoln Kirstein and the renowned choreographer George Balanchine. Over the past 80 years, the Lincoln Center-based school has enrolled some 17,000 students, with over 2,000 having become professional dancers at New York City Ballet and countless other companies around the U.S. and abroad. Today, SAB-trained dancers appear on the rosters of over 65 U.S. and one dozen international companies. Peter Martins is the artistic director and chairman of faculty of the School, which is the official academy of New York City Ballet. New York-area children enrolled at SAB are featured annually in New York City Ballet's beloved production of George Balanchine's The Nutcracker at Lincoln Center. The School's advanced students come to train at SAB from around the United States and abroad and represent some of the most promising young talent in the U.S. Students aged 6 to 18 are admitted by audition only. www.sab.org. SAB's presentation of The Beauty of Ballet is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts Walt Whitman Theatre at Brooklyn College 2 train to Brooklyn College/Flatbush Avenue Online orders: BrooklynCenterOnline.org Box Office: (718) 951-4500 (Tues-Sat, 1pm-6pm) About Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts Founded in 1954, Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts at Brooklyn College presents outstanding performing arts and arts education programs, reflective of Brooklyn's diverse communities, at affordable prices. Each season, Brooklyn Center welcomes over 65,000 people to the 2,400 seat Walt Whitman Theatre, including up to 45,000 schoolchildren from over 300 schools who attend their SchoolTime series, one of the largest arts-in-education programs in the borough. In 2014-15, Brooklyn Center will celebrate its 60th anniversary season, which will correspond with the opening of the new Leonard and Claire Tow Center for the Performing Arts at Brooklyn College. Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts' programs are supported, in part, by public funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Major support for the 2013-14 season is provided by: Brooklyn College; Target; Con Edison; TD Bank; National Grid; Macy's Foundation; Mertz Gilmore Foundation; TD Charitable Foundation; the Henry and Lucy Moses Foundation, Inc.; the Herman Goldman Foundation; the Alice Lawrence Foundation; and The Harkness Foundation for Dance. Additional support provided by CNG Publications and The Brooklyn Eagle. The Sheraton Brooklyn New York Hotel is the official hotel of Brooklyn Center's 2013-14 season. Backstage catering is graciously provided by Applebee's. Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts gratefully acknowledges generous support from New York State Assembly members Rhoda Jacobs, Alan Maisel, Félix Ortiz, Annette Robinson, and Helene E. Weinstein, New York City Councilman Albert Vann and the Department of Youth & Community Development, New York City Council Speaker Christine C. Quinn, and Commissioner of Cultural Affairs Kate Levin. #
  10. From the publicist: The School of American Ballet announces 2014 WINTER BALL: Celebrating SAB's 80th Anniversary at the David H. Koch Theater on Monday, March 3, 2014 The School of American Ballet announces the 2014 Winter Ball at Lincoln Center's David H. Koch Theater on Monday, March 3, 2014, sponsored for the seventh consecutive year by legendary French Maison Van Cleef & Arpels. Cocktails begin at 7pm and dinner will commence at 8pm, followed by The Encore dessert and dancing at 9pm. Attire is black tie. To purchase tickets, a table, or for more information, please contact Natalie Schweizer at nschweizer@sab.org or (212) 769-6610. This glamorous annual dinner dance is attended by 500 patrons, including the School's board members and alumni as well as leaders from the New York corporate and social communities. A highlight of the evening includes a one-time-only performance by the advanced students of The School of American Ballet choreographed by Silas Farley, selected for the second consecutive year by Peter Martins, Artistic Director and Chairman of Faculty for the School of American Ballet. The proceeds from this event enable SAB to distribute $1.8 million annually in student scholarships and support the School's renowned faculty and state-of-the-art facilities at Lincoln Center. This year's event will be a Starry Night celebrating SAB's 80 years of dedication to the field of ballet, as attendees toast the School's good fortune at this momentous anniversary. Ron Wendt Design will create another unforgettable atmosphere for the event. For the seventh consecutive year, Van Cleef & Arpels is the lead corporate sponsor of the gala. This partnership salutes the storied friendship between SAB's founder George Balanchine and Van Cleef & Arpels founder Claude Arpels. The Encore is the Winter Ball after-party. Following dinner, 200 of the city's most sophisticated philanthropic young professionals join the Winter Ball for dancing and dessert. Dinner tickets include admission to The Encore and after-party-only tickets are also available. The event is led by Chairmen Diana DiMenna, Julia Koch, and Serena Lese; and Young Patron Chairmen Noreen Ahmad, Amanda Brotman and Chelsea Zalopany. ABOUT SCHOOL OF AMERICAN BALLET The School of American Ballet, the official training academy of the New York City Ballet, was established in 1934 by legendary choreographer George Balanchine and philanthropist Lincoln Kirstein as the first and most essential step in their quest to create an American classical ballet company. SAB, located at New York City's Lincoln Center, is the premier ballet academy in the United States, training more students who go on to become professional dancers than any other school. SAB's former students fill the ranks of the New York City Ballet and other leading U.S. and international ballet companies. #
  11. From the publicist: Russian National Ballet Theatre Elena Radchenko, Artistic Director performs THE SLEEPING BEAUTY Sunday, March 23, 2014 at 3:00pm At Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts at Brooklyn College (BCBC) concludes its 2013-14 World of Dance series with the internationally acclaimed Russian National Ballet Theatre's interpretation of The Sleeping Beauty on Sunday, March 23, 2014 at 3:00pm. Tickets are $36/$45 and can be purchased by phone at 718-951-4500 (Tues-Sat, 1pm-6pm) or online at BrooklynCenterOnline.org. With its fairy tale story of a beautiful princess, a passionate prince, and the evil spell that threatens their happiness together, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's The Sleeping Beauty was composed in 1888-89 as a commission by Ivan Vsevolozhsky, head of the Russian Imperial Theatres in St. Petersburg. Tchaikovsky did not hesitate to accept the commission, in spite of the fact that his previous ballet, Swan Lake, met with little success after its first year of performance. Based on the Brothers Grimm's version of Charles Perrault's story La Belle au bois dormant, and choreographed by legendary Imperial Ballet Master Marius Petipa, The Sleeping Beauty premiered at the Imperial Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg on January 15, 1890. The premiere received more favorable accolades than Swan Lake and, by 1903, was the second most popular ballet in the repertory of the Imperial Ballet, having been performed 200 times in only 10 years. The Sleeping Beauty was the first of Petipa's classics to be seen in Western Europe. Under the title The Sleeping Princess, it was presented by Serge Diaghilev (1872-1929) in London in 1921. In 1939, it was remounted in Great Britain and has been considered the foundation of the Classical ballet repertory in that country ever since. It has now been adopted worldwide, and performance of the leading role remains a kind of initiation rite for aspiring ballerinas. About Russian National Ballet Theatre The Russian National Ballet Theatre was founded in Moscow during the transitional period of Perestroika in the late 1980s, when many of the great dancers and choreographers of the Soviet Union's ballet institutions were exercising their new-found creative freedom by starting new, vibrant companies dedicated not only to preserving the timeless tradition of classical Russian Ballet but also invigorating this tradition with new developments in dance from around the world. The company, then titled the Soviet National Ballet, incorporated graduates from the great Russian choreographic schools of Moscow, St. Petersburg and Perm. The principal dancers of the company came from the upper ranks of the great ballet companies and academies of Russia, and the companies of Riga, Kiev and even Warsaw. Today, the Russian National Ballet Theatre is its own institution, with over 50 dancers of singular instruction and vast experience. In 1994, the legendary Bolshoi principal dancer Elena Radchenko was selected by Presidential decree to assume the first permanent artistic directorship of the company. Ms. Radchenko has focused the company on upholding the grand national tradition of the major Russian ballet works and developing new talents throughout Russia, with a repertory of virtually all of the great full-length works of Petipa: Don Quixote, La Bayadere, The Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake, Raymonda, Paquita, Coppelia and La Sylphide, as well as productions of, among others, The Nutcracker, Sylvia, and La Fille Mal Gardee. Major support for Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts' World of Dance series is provided by the Macy's Foundation, the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, and The Harkness Foundation for Dance. Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts Walt Whitman Theatre at Brooklyn College 2 train to Brooklyn College/Flatbush Avenue Online orders: BrooklynCenterOnline.org Box Office: (718) 951-4500 (Tues-Sat, 1pm-6pm) Groups of 15 or more: (718) 951-4600, ext. 3331 About Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts Founded in 1954, Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts at Brooklyn College presents outstanding performing arts and arts education programs, reflective of Brooklyn's diverse communities, at affordable prices. Each season, Brooklyn Center welcomes over 65,000 people to the 2,400 seat Walt Whitman Theatre, including up to 45,000 schoolchildren from over 300 schools who attend their SchoolTime series, one of the largest arts-in-education programs in the borough. In 2014-15, Brooklyn Center will celebrate its 60th anniversary season, which will correspond with the opening of the new Leonard and Claire Tow Center for the Performing Arts at Brooklyn College. Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts' programs are supported, in part, by public funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Major support for the 2013-14 season is provided by: Brooklyn College; Target; Con Edison; TD Bank; National Grid; Macy's Foundation; Mertz Gilmore Foundation; TD Charitable Foundation; the Henry and Lucy Moses Foundation, Inc.; the Herman Goldman Foundation; the Alice Lawrence Foundation; and The Harkness Foundation for Dance. Additional support provided by CNG Publications and The Brooklyn Eagle. The Sheraton Brooklyn New York Hotel is the official hotel of Brooklyn Center's 2013-14 season. Backstage catering is graciously provided by Applebee's. Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts gratefully acknowledges generous support from New York State Assembly members Rhoda Jacobs, Alan Maisel, Félix Ortiz, Annette Robinson, and Helene E. Weinstein, New York City Councilman Albert Vann and the Department of Youth & Community Development, New York City Council Speaker Christine C. Quinn, and Commissioner of Cultural Affairs Kate Levin. #
  12. From the publicist: New York Theatre Ballet celebrates 35 Years with VISIONARIES January 24 and 25, 2014 at 7pm "The generous breadth of taste shown by New York Theatre Ballet... is good for New York's whole dance scene." - Alastair Macaulay, The New York Times PLEASE JOIN US: Friday, January 24, 2014 at 7pm Saturday, January 25, 2014 at 7pm New York Theatre Ballet celebrates 35 years with VISIONARIES at Florence Gould Hall, 55 East 59th Street, NYC. VISIONARIES, the first of two programs in the series LEGENDS AND VISIONARIES, performs on Friday, January 24 and Saturday, January 25, 2013 at 7pm. Tickets are $30 ($20 for students and seniors) and are available for purchase at www.ticketmaster.com or by calling 800-982-2787. VISIONARIES performance program features a 2013 NYTB commission choreographed by Pam Tanowitz, accompanied by live music by Lou Harrison and Henry Cowell, as well as a pas de deux choreographed by Richard Alston in addition to other pieces. New York Theatre Ballet's repertory pairs the ballets of legendary creators with those of contemporary visionaries, bringing a new understanding and appreciation of dance. This season features new works and beloved favorites from choreographers including Dan Siretta, Gemma Bond, Pam Tanowitz, Richard Alston, Antonia Franceschi, Remy Charlip, and Antony Tudor. VISIONARIES includes: Short Memory by Pam Tanowitz: A 2013 NYTB Commission, with live music by Lou Harrison and Henry Cowell, helps set up Ms. Tanowitz's brilliant use of stage space. "Short Memory is a dance for six, yet the groupings and comings and goings make it seem more populous. Eccentric gestures like wriggling fingers are woven into unpredictable yet convincing patterns, bristling with witty detail." (Brian Seibert, The New York Times, 2/24/13) Light Flooding Into Darkened Rooms by Richard Alston is inspired by Vermeer's paintings. The ballet, a pas de deux of rare intimacy, conveys a delicacy of feeling masking the formal facade of propriety and gracious behavior. Jo Kondo's Ars Breview, music inspired by Gaultier's "broken style," adds a 20th century tension to this formality with music inspired by Denis Gaulter's 17th century lute pieces, adds a more overt picture of the undercurrents swirling beneath a demeanor of dignity. Jazz, choreography by Antonia Franceschi with an original score by Allen Shawn Libera!, choreography by Marco Pelle Run Loose by Gemma Bond Ten Imaginary Dances, choreography by Remy Charlip, read by David Vaughan The World Premiere of Three Shades of Blue, choreography by Dan Siretta with an original score by Lynn Crigle The second program in the series, LEGENDS, will perform on Friday, May 9, 2014 and Saturday, May 10, 2014 at 7pm. LEGENDS includes a full evening of ballets by Antony Tudor - A. Tudor Celebration: Jardin aux Lilas (Lilac Garden): The bittersweet theme is set in the gracious Eduardian era. A young woman betrothed to a man she does not want to marry, mirrors the society in which power and position are uppermost. The ballet is so musically constructed that it would seem Ernest Chausson, musician and composer of the ballet, indeed wrote it for the ballet. The changes of weight amplify the changes of emotion. And while the movement vocabulary is simple in its use of ballet steps and gestures, the choreography and layering of emotional content are dense. Dark Elegies: Tudor described this as his favorite ballet and many people agree and consider it to be his greatest. From tender moments of quiet devastation to careering bursts of rage, Tudor's "ballet requiem," set to Gustav Mahler's absorbing Kindertotenlieder, expresses the raw emotion of a tight knit community faced with the inexplicable loss of their beloved children. Trio Con Brio is a short, punchy pas de trois technical statement for two men and one women. In 2008, a 16 mm film was found by Norton Owen at Jacob's Pillow. Diana Byer and then-Music Director Ferdy Tumakaka took a year to reconstruct the pas de trois. A minute was burned out and Lance Westergard re-choreographed that small section. Judgment of Paris: The Greek legend transferred to a French Café, late at night, where a drunken boulevardier makes his choice from three sad and aging ladies of pleasure. Soiree Musicale: A charming divertissement set to Benjamin Britton's suite based on pieces by Rossini. Legend has it that in conceiving the choreography, Tudor had in mind four of the great ballerinas of the Romantic period, Lucille Grahn for the Canzonetta, Marie Taglioni for the Tirolese, Fanny Elssler for the Bolaro and Fanny Cerrito for the Tarantella. For full season information visit www.nytb.org. ABOUT NEW YORK THEATRE BALLET New York Theatre Ballet (NYTB), founded in 1978 by artistic director Diana Byer, is the most widely seen chamber ballet company in the United States and has been hailed by The New York Times as "an invaluable company." NYTB is dedicated to inspiring a love of dance in diverse audiences through performances of chamber ballet masterpieces and bold new works, as well as innovative one-hour ballets for children, all at affordable prices. By pairing the ballets of legendary creators with those of contemporary visionaries, NYTB brings a new understanding and appreciation of dance. The approach to live performance for children is groundbreaking and unique. New York Theatre Ballet offers an annual series of hour-long ballets tailored to the attention span of young audience members, while offering high production values and clever choreography sophisticated enough for discerning parents. NYTB is committed to reaching underserved audiences by performing in small cities throughout the U.S. Its professional school provides ballet training based on the Cecchetti syllabus. Classes are offered at affordable prices. Scholarships are awarded to talented homeless and underserved children along with support for well-rounded learning. #
  13. From the publicist: NEW YORK THEATRE BALLET announces The Alice-in-Wonderland Follies January 25 & 26, 2014 at Florence Gould Hall PLEASE JOIN US: Saturday, January 25, 2014 at 1pm Sunday, January 26, 2014 at 11am, 1pm, and 3:30pm New York Theatre Ballet announces The Alice-in-Wonderland Follies choreographed by Keith Michael at New York City's Florence Gould Hall, 55 East 59th Street, New York City. Performances are at Saturday, January 25, 2014 at 1pm and Sunday, January 26, 2014 at 11am, 1pm, and 3:30pm. Tickets are $39 and are available at online at www.nytb.org, via Ticketmaster at (800) 982-2787, or in-person at the Florence Gould Hall box office. For more information, contact the Florence Gould Hall box office at (212) 355-6160. "Imagine a totally unwired world and the impact of so much visual richness on the children in it. Then unplug a 21st century kid, and head for the Gould..."- The Village Voice Follow Alice's adventures through Wonderland as she meets some of the most beloved characters in children's literature. Presented in a vaudeville setting (NY circa 1915) this eclectic ballet draws on many different dance forms - from Irish step dancing to African Jubba to classical ballet. The ballet features sets by Gillian Bradshaw-Smith and costumes by Sylvia Taalshon Nolan, Resident Costume Designer of the Metropolitan opera. The Alice-in-Wonderland Follies is part of NYTB's Once Upon a Ballet series. Other ballets in the Once Upon a Ballet series include: Cinderella March 1-2, 2014 at 11am, 1pm, and 3:30pm Carnival of the Animals & Sleeping Beauty's Wedding May 3, 2014 at 1pm, May 4 at 11am, 1pm, and 3:30pm ABOUT NEW YORK THEATRE BALLET New York Theatre Ballet (NYTB), founded in 1978 by artistic director Diana Byer, is the most widely seen chamber ballet company in the United States and has been hailed by The New York Times as "an invaluable company." NYTB is dedicated to inspiring a love of dance in diverse audiences through performances of chamber ballet masterpieces and bold new works, as well as innovative one-hour ballets for children, all at affordable prices. By pairing the ballets of legendary creators with those of contemporary visionaries, NYTB brings a new understanding and appreciation of dance. The approach to live performance for children is groundbreaking and unique. New York Theatre Ballet offers an annual series of hour-long ballets tailored to the attention span of young audience members, while offering high production values and clever choreography sophisticated enough for discerning parents. NYTB is committed to reaching underserved audiences by performing in small cities throughout the U.S. Its professional school provides ballet training based on the Cecchetti syllabus. Classes are offered at affordable prices. Scholarships are awarded to talented homeless and underserved children along with support for well-rounded learning. #
  14. Welcome to BalletAlert!, nicoletteliles. For your first ballet experience, I'd recommend the back of the First Ring. My personal preference is to be a little higher, but the difference between the back of First v. the back of Third Ring is significant. You'll enjoy greater immediacy while still having a full view of the stage. If you are within what would be considered a normal height range, your view will not be obscured by the person in front of you unless 1) s/he is unusually tall, or 2) s/he insists on leaning forward. Usually, a gentle tap on the shoulder and polite request to sit back fixes the latter. I hope you will report back and tell us how you liked it.
  15. Welcome, beancounter. Can you tell us a little about your interest in ballet? How and when did it start? Any special highlights of past viewing you'd like to tell us about? I hope you enjoy browsing and participating.